2016-2017 Course Descriptions

Biblical Literature  (BLS)

Biblical Literature is the study of the literature of the Bible which takes into consideration the language, history, culture, and geography of the ancient world. The discipline focuses on the major sections of Scripture which are studied as to their literary, thematic, and theological contributions.

Each Biblical Literature course involves the study of the historical setting, specific purpose, and thematic development of the biblical materials with a view to identifying principles for application. Serious effort is made to discover the dynamic relevancy of the biblical materials for today.

BLS501 – Interpreting Genesis to Song of Solomon

This initial course in biblical literature lays a foundation for the further study of the Bible by introducing the biblical covenants and God’s kingdom program. Our examination of the Pentateuch will focus on the great attributes of God. The historical books will show how God works among His people. We will conclude with a consideration of the practical lessons found in the Wisdom Books and Psalms. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. 4 credits.

BLS501X – Interpreting the Old Testament I: Genesis to 2 Samuel

Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. 2 credits.

BLS501Y – Interpreting the Old Testament II: 1 Kings - Song of Solomon

Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. 2 credits.

BLS502 – Interpreting the Prophets and Gospels

In this course you will learn the historical background of each of the prophets and become acquainted with their distinctive contribution and modern relevance. After examining the prophecies concerning the Messiah, you will see how they are fulfilled in Jesus Christ. Our focus in the Gospels will be on Matthew and John. You will study Jesus’ teachings, miracles, and parables with consideration given to present day application. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. 4 credits.

BLS502X – Interpreting the Old Testament III: The Prophets

Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. 2 credits.

BLS502Y – Interpreting New Testament I: The Gospels

Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. 2 credits.

BLS503 – Interpreting Acts to Revelation

Our focus in the early part of the course will be on the beginnings of the church. As we trace Paul’s life, we will study his letters in the order in which they were written, giving attention to the historical and cultural settings. Special focus will be given to Paul’s great teachings on salvation, justification, and sanctification. Our attention will then turn to the subject of eschatology as we examine the General Epistles and Revelation. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. 4 credits.

BLS503X – Interpreting the New Testament II: Epistles 1

The course will focus upon Acts, Galatians, 1-2 Thessalonians, 1-2 Corinthians, Romans. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. 2 credits.

BLS503Y – Interpreting the New Testament III: Epistles 2

The course will focus upon Ephesians, Colossians, and 1 Timothy through the Revelation. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. 2 credits.

BLS511 – Interpreting Genesis to Song of Solomon Survey

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) This initial course in biblical literature lays a foundation for the further study of the Bible by introducing the biblical covenants and God’s kingdom program. Our examination of the Pentateuch will focus on the great attributes of God. The historical books will show how God works among His people. We will conclude with a consideration of the practical lessons found in the Wisdom Books and Psalms. Required for M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only; other degree students enroll in BLS 501. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 2 credits.

BLS511X – Survey of Genesis - 2 Samuel

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) This initial course in biblical literature lays a foundation for further study of the Bible by introducing the biblical covenants and God’s kingdom program. Our examination of the Pentateuch will focus on the great attributes of God. The historical books will show how God works among His people. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 1 credit.

BLS511Y – Survey of Kings - Song of Solomon

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) This course continues our study of God’s work among the Israelite people, as related in the historical books. Our focus then shifts to a consideration of the practical lessons found in the Wisdom Books and Psalms. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 1 credit.

BLS512 – Interpreting Prophets & Gospels Survey

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) In this course you will learn the historical background of each of the prophets and become acquainted with their distinctive contribution and modern relevance. After examining the prophecies concerning the Messiah, you will see how they are fulfilled in Jesus Christ. Our focus in the Gospels will be on Matthew and John. You will study Jesus’ teachings, miracles, and parables with consideration given to present day application. Required for M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only; other degree students enroll in BLS 502. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 2 credits.

BLS512X – Survey of the Prophets

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) In this course you will learn the historical background of each of the prophets and become acquainted with their distinctive contribution and modern relevance. You will examine the prophecies concerning the Messiah, with a view to how they are fulfilled in the person of Jesus Christ. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 1 credit.

BLS512Y – Survey of the Gospels

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) In this course we will focus on the books of Matthew and John. We will see how Jesus fulfilled Old Testament prophecies, and will explore his teachings, miracles and parables. Special attention will be given to present-day application of the Gospels. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 1 credit.

BLS513 – Interpreting Acts to Revelation Survey

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) Our focus in the early part of the course will be on the beginnings of the church. As we trace Paul’s life, we will study his letters in the order in which they were written, giving attention to the historical and cultural settings. Special focus will be given to Paul’s great teachings on salvation, justification, and sanctification. Our attention will then turn to the subject of eschatology as we examine the General Epistles and Revelation. Required for M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only; other degree students enroll in BLS 503. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 2 credits.

BLS513X – Survey Interpreting the New Testament II: Epistles 1

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) This course is designed to facilitate your study of Acts and Paul’s early Epistles. Our focus in the early part of the course will be on the beginnings of the church. As we trace Paul’s life, we will study his letters in the order in which they were written, giving attention to the historical and cultural settings. Special focus will be given to Paul’s great teachings on salvation, justification, and sanctification. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 1 credit.

BLS513Y – Survey of the Epistles 2

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) This final course in our biblical literature survey covers the epistles written in the latter part of the apostolic period. These include Paul’s prison and pastoral epistles, the general epistles, and the book of Revelation. As we study these books, our focus will be on eschatology and the practical implications this material should have on our daily lives. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 1 credit.

BLS516 – Integrative Old Testament Biblical Literature

This course helps the student to understand the canonical scope of the Bible and to highlight truths found in Old Testament biblical literature that contribute to an understanding of gospel-centered transformation in counseling settings. Basic skills for interpreting Scripture will be introduced and illlustrated in surveying Old Testament passages central to contemporary counseling issues. Required for M.A. in Counseling students only; other degree students enroll in BLS 501. 2 hours.

BLS517 – Integrative New Testament Biblical Literature

This course highlights truths found in New Testament biblical literature that contribute to understanding a life of faith. Students will explore key texts and themes which include the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus in the gospel message as well as instructions for daily living particularly germane to contemporary counseling issues. Required for M.A. in Counseling students only; other degree students enroll in BLS 502. 2 hours.

BLS521 – Genesis

This course involves a detailed study of Genesis with emphasis on the institutions, persons, and events that shaped the rest of history. Key principles of life are examined in light of further biblical amplification. 2 credits.

BLS523 – Isaiah

The life and times of this evangelical prophet, evaluation of his character, exposition of his message, and an examination of his culture and Messianic emphasis. 2 credits.

BLS525 – Exposition of Deuteronomy

Deuteronomy is the canonical link between the Pentateuch and the prophets. We will look at different issues important for the study of the book, like authorship, structure, theology, date and outlook of the book. We will examine its influence on the believer’s life, one’s walk with God, one’s behavior in the larger community as well as its influence on the whole Bible. 2 credits.

BLS527 – Psalms

This course offers an exposition of the Psalms with attention to theology and personal application. Students will learn how to understand these poems in their formal categories and how to incorporate basic concepts from the Psalms in life and ministry. 2 credits.

BLS528 – Exposition of Wisdom Literature

Students will explore the Old Testament wisdom books—Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs—in light of literary genre, theology, and application. 2 credits.

BLS529 – Life of Moses

Apart from Jesus Christ, no person in history has made such a deep and lasting impression on the world as Moses. This class focuses on the life and writings of Moses as he is called of God, brings his people out of Egypt, mediates the God’s giving of the Law, and leads Israel on their march to the border of the promise land. Moses’ accomplishments, failures and relationship with God will be considered as we study the life of this “servant of God” (Rev. 15:3). 2 credits.

BLS535 – Life of Christ

The life of Jesus Christ is the very foundation of biblical Christianity. This course is devoted to the study of the life and teachings of Jesus as recorded in the four Gospels. Attention is given to the major events and turning points in His ministry and the interpretation of Jesus’ teachings. The historical, cultural, and geographical setting provides the context for our interpretation and understanding of Jesus’ ministry. 2 credits.

BLS538 – Epistle to the Romans

This course is designed to lead the student in a study of the book of Romans. The structure and argumentation of this all-important epistle will be considered. Special emphasis will be given to the major doctrinal themes and ethical issues with a view to practical application to the local church and its ministry. 2 credits.

BLS541 – Exposition of Galatians

Paul was engaged in a battle for the gospel in Galatians. By focusing on the interpretation of the letter, Paul’s counterattack against the false teachers will be explored. Particular emphasis will also be placed on Paul’s view of the law and his theology of justification. In addition, the application of the letter to the world of today will be discussed. 2 credits.

BLS544 – Pastoral Epistles

This course is an expository study of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus, with emphasis on the theological and practical relevance of the pastorals for society, for the church, and for church leadership. 2 credits.

BLS545 – Exposition of Hebrews

This course involves the study of the book of Hebrews both synthetically and analytically. Historical context of composition and the intrinsic literary structure will receive special attention. 2 credits.

BLS546 – Revelation

An evaluation of the various interpretive approaches to the book; including its relationship to other parts of the Bible; a determination of the symbolism employed; and a careful exposition of the text. Its premillennial eschatology is shown to be centered in the person and work of Christ. 2 credits.

BLS552 – Exploring the Land of the Bible

This course introduces three disciplines which are very helpful in reading and interpreting Scripture: biblical archaeology, biblical culture and historical geography. The course will function as a virtual time machine, taking students back to the biblical period to learn how the people of Israel lived, worked and worshiped. The purpose of the course is to provide students with sufficient background to read and interpret Scripture through the eyes of the earliest readers. 2 credits.

BLS560 – Select Topics in Biblical Literature

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

BLS561N – Understanding Judaism

Because Christianity is deeply rooted in the Old Testament, it is important for Christians to understand and appreciate the theology, history and customs of Judaism. The challenge for Christians is to appreciate the fact that Judaism is a religion of transition that has adapted itself to changing conditions throughout the centuries. The concept of “dual Torah” provides the basis for a growing and developing Judaism. This course will provide a foundation for understanding and appreciating Judaism. A major segment of the course is devoted to anti-Semitism and the Holocaust. 2 credits.

BLS566F – Greece and Turkey Study Tour

This is a course designed to give the student knowledge of the Gentile world the Apostle Paul encountered as he set out on his missionary journeys. Focus will be given to Hellenistic, Roman, and Jewish cultures, as they intersected in the Mediterranean world. Study of key passages in both the book of Acts and various Pauline epistles will be made. All of this will be enriched by on site experiences, beginning with Paul’s birthplace, and ending with Paul’s ministry in Athens. On site emphases will include Ephesus, Philippi, Corinth, and Athens. In addition to the significant cities of the missionary travels of Paul, selected cities mentioned from the book of Revelation will be visited. The focus is on the movement of Christianity from its roots in first century Judaism to the Grecian-Roman world in which it expanded. 2 credits.

BLS566G – Israel Study Program

A three-week course in the geographical and historical settings of the Bible is offered in conjunction with the Jerusalem University College. The course is taken on Mt. Zion at the Jerusalem University College campus. Guided field trips as well as class lecturers introduce the students to the geographical regions, travel routes, and archaeological remains throughout the land of Israel. Students visit such biblical sites as Jerusalem, Bethlehem, Jericho, Hazor, Megiddo, and Capernaum. Overnight stays in the Negev and by the Sea of Galilee enable students to see how the Land of Israel shaped and influenced history of God’s dealings with His covenant people. 4 credits.

BLS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator is required. 1-4 credits.

BLS621 – Genesis

This course involves a detailed study of Genesis with emphasis on the institutions, persons, and events that shaped the rest of history. Key principles of life are examined in light of further biblical amplification. 2 credits.

BLS623 – Isaiah

The life and times of this evangelical prophet, evaluation of his character, exposition of his message, and an examination of his culture and Messianic emphasis. 2 credits.

BLS625 – Exposition of Deuteronomy

Deuteronomy is the canonical link between the Pentateuch and the prophets. We will look at different issues important for the study of the book, like authorship, structure, theology, date and outlook of the book. We will examine its influence on the believer’s life, one’s walk with God, one’s behavior in the larger community as well as its influence on the whole Bible. 2 credits.

BLS635 – The Life of Jesus Christ

The life of Jesus Christ is the very foundation of biblical Christianity. This course is devoted to the study of the life and teachings of Jesus as recorded in the four Gospels. Attention is given to the major events and turning points in His ministry and the interpretation of Jesus’ teachings. The historical, cultural, and geographical setting provides the context for our interpretation and understanding of Jesus’ ministry. 2 credits.

BLS645 – Exposition of Hebrews

This course involves the study of the book of Hebrews both synthetically and analytically. Historical context of composition and the intrinsic literary structure will receive special attention. 2 credits.

BLS646 – Revelation

An evaluation of the various interpretive approaches to the book; including its relationship to other parts of the Bible; a determination of the symbolism employed; and a careful exposition of the text. Its premillennial eschatology is shown to be centered in the person and work of Christ. 2 credits.

BLS660 – Select Topics in Biblical Literature

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

BLS680 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator is required. 1-4 credits.

Biblical Studies  (DBS)

DBS506 – Learning to Interpreting Scripture

In this course you will study the foundational principles and interpretive procedures of the grammatico-historical method of biblical interpretation. You will also apply these principles and procedures in actual Bible study, using the English Bible. Required during the first year of M.A. or M.Div. studies. 4 credits.

DBS507 – Advanced Hermeneutics

The purpose of this class is to investigate biblical interpretation in light of current theological, philosophical, ecclesiological, historical and social challenges.? The student will be exposed to current scholarship?on a variety of hermeneutical topics and will learn to both defend and demonstrate the authority of the whole of Scripture by interpreting to hear the Word of God. Enrollment limited to students granted advanced standing in DBS 506. 2 credits.

DBS516 – Learning to Interpret Scripture Survey

(M.A. in Counseling students only) In this course you will study the foundational principles and interpretive procedures of the grammatico-historical method of biblical interpretation. You will also apply these principles and procedures in actual Bible study, using the English Bible. Required for M.A. in Counseling, M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy, and M.A. in Intercultural Studies students only; other degree students enroll in DBS 506. 2 credits.

DBS560 – Select Topics in Biblical Studies

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

DBS660 – Select Topics in Biblical Studies

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

Chaplaincy Ministry  (ICS)

ICS501 – The Chaplaincy

In this course students are introduced to and equipped for the mission field of chaplaincy ministry. A wide range of topics is covered, from possible areas of service to various expectations placed upon military, law enforcement, and institutional chaplains. 2 credits.

ICS505 – Hospital Chaplaincy

The unique nature of hospital chaplaincy is investigated in this course. Attention is given to appropriate relationships with hospital staff and patients and their families, issues such as death and dying, and other features pertinent to hospital ministry. Work is done in case studies, and fieldwork is engaged in actual hospital visits. 2 credits.

ICS506 – The Military Chaplaincy

Particular attention is given to the nature and work of the military chaplaincy. Students explore expectations related to work in a multi-faith environment, and learn how the various branches of the military function relative to their chaplains. Emphasis is given to life and ministry issues (such as frequent mobility, separation from family, etc.) peculiar to persons in the military. Practical matters pertaining to such things as securing endorsement and appointment as a chaplain are also treated. 2 credits.

ICS530 – Chaplaincy Practicum

An intense, guided field education experience in the student’s area of ministry concentration. Veteran, career chaplains in military or institutional settings, carefully supervise the student as he/she gains expertise in the military chaplaincy or in one of the institutional chaplaincies for which the Seminary provides training. 1-4 credits.

ICS533 – Clinical Pastoral Education

Approval required. 1-2 credits.

ICS560 – Select Topics in Chaplaincy Ministry

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

ICS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

ICS680 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

Coaching Ministry Studies  (MCS)

MCS510 – Introduction to Coaching

This course provides students with a basic foundation for understanding and practicing coaching. Topics covered include: core coaching skills, coaching conversation model, the biblical basis for coaching, and how the student can use coaching in his or her ministries or workplace. 1 credit.

MCS511 – Coaching Change, Transition, and Transformation

This course provides students the knowledge and skills necessary for coaching individuals and groups through change. Attention is given to understanding different types of change, how to support people going through transitions, and how to use coaching to initiate positive change. Prerequisite: MCS 510. 1 credit.

MCS512 – Life and Personal Coaching

This course provides students with practical tools that can be used when coaching clients through a wide range of personal, life and family isues. Special attention is given to helping students explore how to start a coaching practice, covering topics such as: marketing, legal and financial considerations, networking, and defining your coaching niche. Prerequisite: MCS 510. 1 credit.

MCS513 – Coaching Approach to Leading and Managing

This course provides students the knowledge and skill necessary for taking a coach approach to working with teams, managing direct reports/volunteers, and leading within a church or other organization. Prerequisite: MCS 510. 1 credit.

MCS514 – Coaching Spiritual Transformation

This course provides students the knowledge and skills necessary to apply coaching to faith conversations. Attention is given to how a dialogical approach can be effective for evangelism and discipleship, how coaching can be expressed in the ministries of a local church, and the relationship between coaching competencies and Christian practices. Prerequisite: MCS 510. 1 credit.

MCS515 – Coaching as a Brain-Based Approach to Learning

In the coaching relationship, the coach is a learning partner in the growth of the person being coached (PBC). This class will provide information on different learning styles, cognitive preferences, and learning processes that reflect how the brain works in order to generate powerful results in the PBC. Skill development focuses upon incorporating the knowledge of learning into coaching questions, statements, and listening. Prerequisite: MCS 510. 1 credit.

MCS516 – Using Assessments, Inventories, and Tools in Coaching

This course provides students an overview of various assessments, inventories, and tools for creating awareness with coaching clients. Among the instruments addressed will be the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), the Leadership Practices Inventory 360 (LPI 360), Strengths Finder 2.0 and DiSC. Attention will be given to discerning which instruments are most useful in which client situations, what steps are necessary for utilizing various instruments, and how to promote effective client engagement with instruments. Prerequisite: MCS 510. 1 credit.

MCS517 – The Language of Coaching

This course helps the coaching student make proper use of powerful language elements such as metaphors, stories, formulas, yellow-flag words, and distinctions. Knowing and using these language elements improves the coaches powerful questioning, active listening, and direct communication. Prerequisite: MCS 510. 1 credit.

MCS518 – Growing Your Coaching Practice

This course focuses on creating dynamic coaching relationships. Focus is given to orienting around strengths and high performance patterns. This course introduces students to the basics of establishing a coaching practice, ethical issues in coaching, and how to expand their coaching clientele. Prerequisite: MCS 510. 1 credit.

MCS519 – Coaching Supervision

This course allows students the opportunity to coach and be coached in an environment that includes faculty and peer feedback for the purpose of enhancing their ability to coach with greater effectiveness. Special attention is given to a student’s desires for advancing toward appropriate ICF competency level and the ICF certification process. Course is conducted via telephone. Prerequisite: MCS 510, two other MCS courses, and at least 25 hours of documented coaching experience. 1 credit. May be repeated.

MCS560 – Select Topics in Coaching Ministry

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

Counseling Ministry  (CNS)

These courses provide training in the theory and practice of counseling, preparing men and women with a commitment to ministry to serve in a variety of church and community settings. Integrates biblical and theological foundations with the insights of psychology and practical counseling methods.

CNS501 – Clinical Foundations: Basic Counseling Skills/Interventions

This course introduces the student to basic skills of attending, empathy, acceptance, genuineness, and concreteness necessary to effective clinical counseling. The course also addresses the additional skills of confrontation, immediacy, self-disclosure, and strategies for change to develop the psychotherapeutic skills for clinical intervention and accomplishing goals. The role of faith in psychotherapy will be explored. Activities include reading, lecture, observation, role playing, and student audio/videotaped clinical practice. 2 credits.

CNS502 – Psychological Theory and Techniques

This course will cover the application and development of treatment strategies and interventions. Focus will be given to an eclectic approach to therapy. Prerequisite: CNS 501, CNS 504. 3 credits in San Jose and Sacramento, 2 credits in Portland.

CNS503 – Family Systems Therapy

This course will include the theoretical and practical approaches to understanding and intervening with families. A review of the major family system theories will be covered. Prerequisites: CNS 501 and CNS 505. 3 credits in San Jose and Sacramento, 2 credits in Portland.

CNS504 – Psychotherapeutic Systems

This course will provide a historical and theoretical overview of the major counseling theorists. 2 credits.

CNS505 – Psychopathology

This course will focus on diagnosis and treatment of the major psychopathologies. Focus will be given to using the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder). 3 credits.

CNS506 – Legal and Ethical Issues

This course will include an overview of professional ethics and state law as applied to counseling in private and state agencies, including addiction recovery programs. Topics to be addressed will include professionalism, licensure and practice issues. Prerequisite: CNS 501. 2 credits in San Jose and Sacramento, 3 credits in Portland.

CNS507 – Human Life Span Development

This course covers human development; including biological, psychological, sociological, and cognitive development from conception to death, including aging and long-term care. Diagnostic and psychotherapeutic issues that are particular to each phase of development will also be highlighted. 3 credits.

CNS508 – Introduction to Integrative Issues

This course provides an introduction to the theological and psychological categories or systems providing one with a model of integrative thought and practice. 2 credits.

CNS509 – Advanced Integration

This course is part two of the required integration classes. It will explore the components and dynamics of the integration process. Focus points will include issues surrounding the person of the counselor in the integrative task, in addition to the assessment of paradigms utilized in cross-disciplinary integration. Topics include (but are not limited to) the history of integration, evaluation of models of integration, addressing objections to integration, the sufficiency of Scripture, the role of the Holy Spirit in counseling, mental health from a Christian world view, God in the treatment process, the role of suffering and hope. A base understanding of theology and psychology is assumed. Prerequisites: CNS 508, CNS 530, THS 501/516. 2 credits.

CNS510 – Spiritual Development and Assessment

The practical and theological dynamics of spirituality will be examined. This course will focus on the process by which we both assess and encourage the spiritual life of those to whom we minister. Attention will be given to understanding the dynamic of spirituality, methodology for assessment, development of spiritual maturity and ways to involve spirituality in pastoral and clinical counseling. Prerequisite: CNS 508. 2 credits.

CNS512 – Group Counseling

This course provides an overview of the principles of group theory, dynamics and process as applied to various therapeutic settings and problems. Prerequisite: CNS 501. 3 credits in San Jose and Sacramento, 2 credits in Portland.

CNS513 – Social and Cultural Foundations

This course will focus on the problems and issues arising from values and assumptions that affect counseling with individuals and families of different ethnic origins, including addictive behavior and co-occurring disorders. Prerequisite: CNS 501. 2 credits.

CNS516 – Marriage Counseling

This course focuses on the principles of effective couples therapy. It prepares students to assess couple relationships and apply effective counseling interventions that promote therapeutic change to the broad range of issues involved in couple counseling. The course will introduce several models of couple therapy from a range of behavioral, emotional, and cognitive therapies, include the common factors model. Prerequisites: CNS 501, CNS 505, CNS 507. 2 credits (Portland), 3 credits (San Jose, Sacramento).

CNS517 – Child and Adolescent Therapy

This course provides an overview of the major treatment modalities for children and adolescents. Prerequisite: CNS 501, CNS 505, CNS 507. 2 credits.

CNS518 – Career and Lifestyle Development

The course begins with an exploration of the theology of work and moves to an examination of career selection and career development theories. Students will learn about occupational information sources and systems as well as lifestyle and career decision making. 2 credits.

CNS519 – Treatment Planning and Outcome Assessment

This course allows students to practice applications of the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and to collaborate with interdisciplinary team members in culturally-inclusive treatment planning and case management. Course content will cover principles and methods of program evaluation, needs assessment, evidence-based practices, and analysis and use of data to increase program effectiveness of clinical mental health counseling interventions and programs. 1 credit.

CNS520 – Professional Orientation

This course will review the history of the counseling profession, including the history and development of clinical mental health counseling.  We will examine the differentiation from and collaboration with other disciplines. It will include information about community resources in a multicultural society, program development, and will review accessibility of mental health services including the need to address institutional and social barriers that impede access, equity, and success. 1 hour.

CNS523 – Human Sexuality

This course will give an overview of the theological, physiological, psychological, and sociological perspectives on human sexuality. It includes a consideration of sexual identity, sexual behavior and sexual disorders as well as an introduction to treatment considerations and referrals. Prerequisite: CNS 505. 2 credits.

CNS524 – Research in Counseling and Family Studies

This course is an introduction to psychological research and testing. The student will be introduced to research design and statistical methodologies. 2 credits.

CNS525 – Tests and Measurements

This course will provide an introduction to testing instruments that are available to the counselor for use in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions within a counseling setting. Prerequisite: CNS 524. 3 credits.

CNS526 – Psychopharmacology

This course provides an overview of basic psychopharmacology including an introduction to the interaction between neurophysiology and psychotropic medications, and how such interactions influence psychotherapy treatment planning and interventions. 1 credit (Portland, prerequisite: CNS 528), 2 credits (Sacramento, San Jose).

CNS527 – Physiology, Pharmacology, and Addiction

This course provides an overview of basic psychopharmacology including an introduction to the interaction between neurophysiology and psychotropic medication, and how such interactions influence psychotherapy treatment planning and intervention. This course includes the biopharmaceutics and physiological effects of addictive behavior, focusing on alcohol and other recreational drugs, especially as to tolerance, withdrawal, and addiction patterns. 2 credits.

CNS528 – Neuropsychology

This course will introduce students to current understanding of brain-behavior relationships. Emphasis will be placed on commonly used approaches in the assessment and measurement of human behavior and how we understand the brain’s role in cognition, language, memory, spatial processing, emotion, spirituality and personality. Students will gain a basic understanding of principles of brain organization, effects of medication and professional/clinical issues in neuropsychology. 1 credit.

CNS529 – Counseling Addictions

This course will examine the major categories of psychoactive drugs, the biology of addiction, and theories of addiction and recovery. Topics include the history and classification of psychoactive drugs, the neurobiology of addiction, principles of drug actions, uses and side effects, the addiction cycle and treatment alternatives. Theories of addiction will be examined from both a worldview and from a spiritual experience. Prerequisites: CNS 501, CNS 505, CNS 507. 2 credits.

CNS530 – Counseling Practicum

This course will provide and professional feedback and evaluation of the student's counseling practicum experience. The student will apply theoretical knowledge in the clinical setting to interviewing, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Pre-requisites: CNS 501, CNS 504, CNS 505, CNS 506, and CNS557. Portland campus. 2 credits.

CNS530M – Counseling Practicum I

This course will provide a supervised counseling experience with an on-site supervisor, and class and faculty feedback and evaluation. The internship requires that the student apply classroom knowledge to interviewing, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of individual, marital, and family dysfunction. Prerequisites required. Enrollment limited to counseling degree students. San Jose or Sacramento campus. 2 credits.

CNS530S – Counseling Practicum I

This course will provide a supervised counseling experience with an on-site supervisor, and class and faculty feedback and evaluation. The internship requires that the student apply classroom knowledge to interviewing, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of individual, marital, and family dysfunction. Prerequisites required. Enrollment limited to counseling degree students. San Jose or Sacramento campus. 2 credits.

CNS530SD – Addiction Studies Practicum I

This course is for students enrolled only in the Addiction Studies Certificate (ASC) program. This course will provide a supervised counseling experience with an on-site supervisor, and class and faculty feedback and evaluation. Prerequisites required. San Jose campus. 1 credit.

CNS531 – Internship Case Conference I

This course will provide and professional feedback and evaluation of the student's counseling practicum experience. The student will apply theoretical knowledge in the clinical setting to interviewing, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Pre-requisites: CNS 501, CNS 504, CNS 505, CNS 506, CNS530, and CNS557. Portland campus. 2 credits.

CNS531M – Counseling Practicum II

San Jose or Sacramento campus. 2 credits.

CNS531S – Counseling Practicum II

San Jose or Sacramento campus. 2 credits.

CNS531SD – Addiction Studies Practicum II

San Jose campus. 1 credit.

CNS532 – Internship Case Conference II

This course will provide and professional feedback and evaluation of the student's counseling practicum experience. The student will apply theoretical knowledge in the clinical setting to interviewing, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Pre-requisites: CNS 501, CNS 504, CNS 505, CNS 506, CNS530-531, and CNS557. Portland campus. 2 credits.

CNS532M – Counseling Practicum III

San Jose or Sacramento campus. 2 credits.

CNS532S – Counseling Practicum III

San Jose or Sacramento campus. 2 credits.

CNS532SD – Addiction Studies Practicum III

San Jose campus. 1 credit.

CNS533 – Internship Case Conference III

This course will provide and professional feedback and evaluation of the student's counseling practicum experience. The student will apply theoretical knowledge in the clinical setting to interviewing, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Pre-requisites: CNS 501, CNS 504, CNS 505, CNS 506, CNS530-532, and CNS557. Portland campus. 2 credits.

CNS534 – Internship Case Conference IV

This course will provide and professional feedback and evaluation of the student's counseling practicum experience. The student will apply theoretical knowledge in the clinical setting to interviewing, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Pre-requisites: CNS 501, CNS 504, CNS 505, CNS 506, CNS530-533, and CNS557. Portland campus. 2 credits.

CNS539 – Advanced Internship Case Conference

This course will provide and professional feedback and evaluation of the student's counseling practicum experience. The student will apply theoretical knowledge in the clinical setting to interviewing, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Pre-requisites: CNS 501, CNS 504, CNS 505, CNS 506, CNS530-534, and CNS557. Portland campus. 1 credit.

CNS539M – Advanced Practicum

San Jose or Sacramento campus. Prerequisite: CNS 532S/M or CNS 534. 1 credit.

CNS539S – Advanced Practicum

San Jose or Sacramento campus. Prerequisite: CNS 532S/M or CNS 534. 1 credit.

CNS539SD – Advanced Addiction Studies Practicum

San Jose campus. 1 credit.

CNS542 – Child Assessment & Treatment

This course is an introduction to the assessment and treatment of children ages three through 12 years of age. 1 credit.

CNS544 – Counseling Violence and Abuse Issues

The purpose of this class is to prepare counselors with skills to recognize and assess clients for possible abuse, develop a clinically and ethically sound strategy of intervention, and construct a theologically sound perspective on violence. The course includes a discussion of abuse which may occur in a variety of settings and ages. State reporting requirements are also considered. Prerequisites: CNS 501, CNS 505, CNS 506, CNS 507. 3 credits in San Jose and Sacramento, 1 credit in Portland.

CNS546 – Counseling Adolescents

This course examines and synthesizes adolescent growth and developmental stages, examines normal and abnormal adolescent behaviors, identifies common adolescent problems/symptoms, and presents counseling techniques and skills resulting in the ability to successfully work with adolescent populations. 1 credit.

CNS547 – Psychopharmacology II

This course is offered for students who desire further study in the interactions between neurophysiology and psychotropic medications. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the therapist as part of a collaborative team of professionals who work with patients/clients to achieve maximum benefit from both medication and psychotherapy. Treatment planning, and medication management, including treatment compliance with challenging clients, will be included. Recommended Co-Requisite: CNS 526. 1 credit.

CNS551 – Advanced Substance Abuse

This course provides a review of specialized skills and knowledge related to the substance abuse services. Topics include intervention, relapse prevention, specialty fields, program development training and cross-discipline studies related to social work, medicine, law, theology, and psychology relevant to addiction professionals. Prerequisite: CNS 529. 2 credits.

CNS552 – Treatment of Addictive Behavior & Counseling Addictive Behavior

This course surveys current standard models of education, prevention, and intervention in substance abuse. The course provides a practical understanding of how to help clients from all populations and major special populations arrive at sobriety in both religious and secular programs. A wide variety of addictive problems will be investigated including denial, relapse, and progression. Prerequisite: CNS 529. 2 credits.

CNS553 – Human Services

This course presents case management, program development and management, and clinical supervision of addiction treatment. This will include specific case presentation skills such as assessment, treatment planning, counseling, crisis intervention and referral. Community care, prevention, education, outreach and response services will be studied. 2 credits.

CNS554 – Addiction Group Dynamics

This course provides an overview of the principles of group dynamics and process specifically related to the addiction recovery population. Pre- or co-requisite: CNS 512. 1 credit.

CNS557 – Emergency Preparedness: Suicide Prevention & Crisis Intervention

Part I. This course provides an overview of the effects of suicide and crises on persons of all ages. Content will include the counselor’s role individually and as part of an interdisciplinary team, and the recovery process surrounding loss and bereavement. 1 credit.

CNS558 – Emergency Preparedness: Crisis Intervention, Trauma & Loss

Part II. This course provides an overview of the effects of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events on persons of all ages. Content will include the counselor’s role individually and as part of an interdisciplinary team in responding to both small- and large-scale trauma and the recovery process surrounding loss and bereavement. Prerequisite: CNS 530. 1 credit.

CNS559 – Emergency Preparedness: Crisis Management and Administration

This course will provide an overview of emergency preparedness and crisis management as well as providing a focus on helping those in crisis including a basic crisis intervention model and appropriate clinical presentations of persons in crisis in a variety of settings, e.g., suicidality, AIDS- and HIV-related, substance abuse, disaster, loss, acute stress disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and victimization. Topics include defining crisis, when crisis is a danger and/or emergency, ethical and professional considerations, and use of self in crisis counseling. Students learn about the theory and skills, mental health triage, cultural sensitivity, community resource information, referrals, treatment planning, and networking related to crisis intervention. 2 credits.

CNS560 – Select Topics in Counseling

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

CNS561L – Premarital Counseling

This course will focus on the rationale, tools, and procedures for premarital education and counseling. The student will be credentialed in the use of Prepare/Enrich materials. 1 credit.

CNS561R – Parent Skills Training

This course is designed to prepare counselors for basic parent skills training. The learner will examine a common core belief of children, ("I want to belong") and how that core belief affects and molds both good behavior and midbehavior. Framework will be introduced that will allow the learner to have a tool for interpreting misbehavior. Techniquest for handling misbehavior will be explored. Key issues and concepts will include communcations, the use of natural logical consequences, common mistakes parents make, use of encouragement, and being a responsible parent. 1 credit.

CNS563K – Advanced Child and Youth Counseling

This course builds on existing experience and coursework in counseling with children and adolescents. Students will integrate previous knowledge and be prepared to provide counseling to child and adolescent clients who are experiencing a range of developmental, relationship, and mental health challenges. We will explore advanced assessment and counseling techniques to use with children and adolescents. The purpose of this course is to learn a variety of interventions and enlage each student's clincal repertoire. Prerequisites: CNS507 and CNS566. 2 credits.

CNS565F – Business of Counseling

Counselors, while excellent at serving others, often lack the necessary skills for the business end of counseling and ministry. To be successful in the work world, counselors need to be equipped in areas basic to operating ethically and successfully in business. This course covers topics such as developing a business plan, marketing, office space, business structures, bookkeeping, billing, malpractice issues, leases, record keeping and staffing. 1 credit.

CNS566 – Introduction to Play Therapy

This course is designed for the novice who desires to learn the basics of non-directive play therapy or for the intermediate practitioner who wishes to refresh their skills. This class is highly interactive and participants will be engaging in role playing and practicing with children. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of non-directive play therapy. It will also teach the basic skills necessary to begin working in non-directive ways with children between the ages of two and twelve years. Participants will learn to identify and assist children who have experienced trauma. Portland campus. 2 credits.

CNS572 – Counseling Supervision I

The course will provide an overview of various methods of supervision. Topics will include building the supervisory relationship, establishing the contract, legal and ethical issues, addressing conflict, and providing effective feedback to the supervisee. 1 credit.

CNS573 – Counseling Supervision II

This course will describe supervision from the various theoretical approaches of brief, solution-focused, cognitive and Adlerian. Topics will include evidence based practices, cultural competency, crisis management, and supervision of supervision. 1 credit.

CNS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator required. 1- 2 credits.

Educational Ministry  (EMS)

These courses provide both philosophical and practical instruction and experience for men and women preparing for ministry that is educational in nature. The courses provide a firm foundation of knowledge, perspective, and ministry practice to ensure continued personal and professional development consistent with biblical values.

EMS505 – Growing Disciples Intentionally

Christ commands His children to “love God, love people and make disciples” (Matt 22:37-40, 28:16-20). This course will examine the role of the local church and para-church organizations in facilitating, guiding, and nurturing the spiritual growth of believers from infancy through the end of life. The teaching/learning process will be evaluated primarily in terms of intentional growth outcomes in the lives of Christians at all levels of spiritual maturity. 2 credits.

EMS546 – Advanced Bible Teaching

This course seeks to help the student develop a larger repertoire of teaching skills as applied to the Bible. The course will explore teaching and learning models, the use of curriculum, and creative techniques in teaching, all within the context of praxis. Prerequisite: DBS 506. 2 credits.

EMS560 – Curriculum Development

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

EMS575 – Readings in Educational Ministry

Guided reading of literature related to a specific aspect of educational ministry. Prerequisite: EMS 501. Registration for this course is by petition only. A student proposal must be approved by the program coordinator prior to registration for the course. 1-2 credits per semester, up to 4 credits maximum.

EMS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. A student proposal must be approved by the program coordinator prior to registration for the course. Prerequisite: EMS 501. 1-2 credits per semester, up to 4 credits maximum.

EMS675 – Readings in Educational Ministry

Guided reading of literature related to a specific aspect of educational ministry. Prerequisite: EMS 501. Registration for this course is by petition only. A student proposal must be approved by the program coordinator prior to registration for the course. 1-2 credits per semester, up to 4 credits maximum.

EMS680 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. A student proposal must be approved by the program coordinator prior to registration for the course. Prerequisite: EMS 501. 1-2 credits per semester, up to 4 credits maximum.

Global Leadership Studies  (GLS)

GLS510 – Spiritual Formation and Discipleship in the Global Context

This course is an investigation into the meaning of biblical spirituality and its relationship to faith and practice within contemporary cultural contexts and amidst the trials and challenges of serving in a global context.  This course seeks to apply gospel-centered evangelical spirituality so that students can learn how to grow in spiritual maturity and stand firm in the gospel as global leaders in whichever context they serve. 2 hours.

GLS515 – Theology in the Global Context

This course will consider some major doctrines of systematic and historical theology and explore how they could be applied and humbly taught in contextually appropriate and culturally-communicative ways for global contexts.  This course will encourage the formulation of critical and constructive theological reflection in order to engage the common challenges of the Majority World and each student’s specialized ministry. 2 hours.

GLS520 – Leadership in the Global Context

This course will explore ways to discern leadership styles in global contexts, and it will seek to apply humble leadership philosophies according to each student’s life and ministry context.  This course will help students grow in effective ministry competence and leadership in a global setting by learning the skills of adjusting leadership styles, serving as learners, and discerning cultural values in order to lead in a culturally-respectful way that honors the gospel. 2 hours.

GLS525 – Self-Directed Learning for Global Leadership

Building upon personal insights gained from MFM500, this course will seek to discover each student’s strengths and weaknesses in terms of cultural adaptation and ministry service.  Each student will seek to consider ways and create a plan for growth and learning for the sake of longevity and fruitfulness in global leadership that demonstrates self-awareness, social competence, and sensitivity to diversity and teamwork in various cultural settings. Prerequisite: MFM500. 2 hours.

GLS531 – Field Leadership Mentorship I

This course is designed to help students gain greater confidence and competence by developing character traits and ministry skills that will be needed in the student’s current or anticipated ministry role. Emphasis will be placed upon the integration of course work (theoretical foundation) with ministry experience within the framework of the Missio Dei, theological reflection, spiritual formation, and missional ecclesiology and leadership. Mentoring is provided through both individual meetings with experienced practitioners (mentors) and peer ministry (student) reflection groups. Current involvement in field ministry is required for enrollment. Students should plan on taking one unit of this course over four different terms to enable sufficient breadth of ministry experience and pastoral mentoring. Prerequisite: MFM500. 1 credit.

GLS532 – Field Leadership Mentorship II

This course is designed to help students gain greater confidence and competence by developing character traits and ministry skills that will be needed in the student’s current or anticipated ministry role. Emphasis will be placed upon the integration of course work (theoretical foundation) with ministry experience within the framework of the Missio Dei, theological reflection, spiritual formation, and missional ecclesiology and leadership. Mentoring is provided through both individual meetings with experienced practitioners (mentors) and peer ministry (student) reflection groups. Current involvement in field ministry is required for enrollment. Students should plan on taking one unit of this course over four different terms to enable sufficient breadth of ministry experience and pastoral mentoring. Prerequisite: GLS531. 1 credit.

GLS533 – Field Leadership Mentorship III

This course is designed to help students gain greater confidence and competence by developing character traits and ministry skills that will be needed in the student’s current or anticipated ministry role. Emphasis will be placed upon the integration of course work (theoretical foundation) with ministry experience within the framework of the Missio Dei, theological reflection, spiritual formation, and missional ecclesiology and leadership. Mentoring is provided through both individual meetings with experienced practitioners (mentors) and peer ministry (student) reflection groups. Current involvement in field ministry is required for enrollment. Students should plan on taking one unit of this course over four different terms to enable sufficient breadth of ministry experience and pastoral mentoring. Prerequisite: GLS532. 1 credit.

GLS534 – Field Leadership Mentorship IV

This course is designed to help students gain greater confidence and competence by developing character traits and ministry skills that will be needed in the student’s current or anticipated ministry role. Emphasis will be placed upon the integration of course work (theoretical foundation) with ministry experience within the framework of the Missio Dei, theological reflection, spiritual formation, and missional ecclesiology and leadership. Mentoring is provided through both individual meetings with experienced practitioners (mentors) and peer ministry (student) reflection groups. Current involvement in field ministry is required for enrollment. Students should plan on taking one unit of this course over four different terms to enable sufficient breadth of ministry experience and pastoral mentoring. Prerequisite: GLS533. 1 credit.

GLS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator is required. 1-4 credits.

Hebrew Scripture  (OTS)

Courses in the area of Hebrew Scripture (the “Old” Testament) are designed to lead you into the discovery of the riches of the larger part of the Bible by a variety of means. First, you will learn the language of the Old Testament Scriptures as a means for a more authentic encounter with its meaning. Second, you will learn the manner of the Old Testament Scriptures. That is, you will discover the nuances of text and truth that are not easily translated. Together, these will serve as a means for deepening your own spiritual life before the Lord, and for enriching your ministries of His word in a wide variety of presentations. We believe the teaching of biblical languages in a practical, hands-on manner, to be an essential element in the thorough preparation for the ministry of the word by God’s servants in the decades to come.

OTS501 – Functional Foundations of Hebrew

For students who choose not to develop the skill to read and translate the Old Testament in Hebrew, Western Seminary offers the functional language track. It is designed to give students the practical ability to access the original Hebrew through the Bible Works computer program and other contemporary reference tools in a “hands on” approach to learning. In the first semester students will develop an understanding of the structure of the Hebrew language and the essentials of Hebrew grammar and syntax along with a foundational Hebrew vocabulary through a guided reading of the book of Ruth. 3 credits plus 1 hour lab. Language fee.

OTS502 – Functional Application of Hebrew

In this second semester of the functional?Hebrew track students will develop their understanding of?Hebrew syntax and learn the key steps of the exegetical process. They will use their skills to study the?Old Testament with access to the original language. By the end of the sequence, students will be able to use original language commentaries with discernment and do many steps of the exegetical process as they prepare sermons and lessons in ministry. 3 credits plus 1 hour lab. Language fee.

OTS503 – Developing Foundations for Hebrew Exegesis

This course aims to help students develop fundamental skills for reading biblical Hebrew texts. During this course, students will memorize additional Hebrew vocabulary, parse Hebrew words, and read Hebrew text without depending on secondary tools. Prerequisites: OTS 501 and OTS 502. 3 credits.

OTS508 – Introducing the Foundation for Hebrew Exegesis

In this class, you will acquire a good foundation of Biblical Hebrew. You will learn the basic grammar up to the strong verb. You will be introduced to the fundamentals of basic Hebrew Syntax. You will further sharpen your Hebrew skills by doing exercises, by reading the book of Ruth, by memorizing some basic vocabulary, and by the use of appropriate Hebrew language tools. 3 credits plus 1 hour lab. Language fee.

OTS509 – Hebrew Reading and Syntax

A short systematic review and presentation of the grammar and syntax will be given, and then, building on the foundation of grammar and vocabulary, the grammar of the weak verb is covered. This knowledge will be further strengthened by reading the book of Jonah, and other various selected passages, with special attention to different points of syntax. An in-depth instruction is given in the use of various computer tools, which will help us in our quest for the meaning of the text. 3 credits plus 1 hour lab. Language fee. Prerequisite: OTS 508.

OTS510 – Hebrew Exegesis: Acquiring Interpretive Skills

This is the crowning achievement of the Hebrew study. In this class you bring all your knowledge to bear on the text to get to the meaning of the text. Through a multi-layered interpretive system, the student will be able to bring out the original meaning of the text. You will produce exegetically sound and expositionally attractive products, useful for theology, teaching, preaching and your own spiritual growth. Prerequisites: OTS 508 and OTS 509. 3 credits.

OTS515 – Principles of Exegesis

In this course students will learn the principles of exegesis following the steps of a method common to both testaments with specific application to the Hebrew language. Topics include the definition and distinctions of exegesis, the relation of exegesis to other disciplines, and contextualizing the text. Prerequisite: OTS 509. 2 credits.

OTS518 – Exegesis in Legal Literature

The “law” of Moses was God’s great gift of grace to the people of Israel with the purpose of forming them into His holy people. In this course you will study selected texts of Torah, with comparison to extra-biblical legal materials, and with a focus of the role Torah was to play in the life of the people. You will also discover ways in which these texts relate to New Testament life and faith. Prerequisite: OTS 510. 2 credits.

OTS520 – Exegeting Hymnic Literature

The Psalms of Israel are among the greatest literary treasures from antiquity, and they form one of the most loved sections of the Bible. They are examples of great spirituality and deep theology. You will learn how to study the Hebrew text of the Psalms with reference to constructive form criticism, how to experience their poetic form, and how to minister to others from these ancient songs of hurt and joy. Psalms for class study will be selected to display a variety of style and content. Prerequisite: OTS 510. 2 credits.

OTS521 – Exegesis of Narrative Literature

Everyone loves a story! Some of the finest stories in the world are found in the pages of the Hebrew Bible. In this course you will learn how these stories work, how to discover nuances from the original text, and how to minister the truth of God from narrative literature. Prerequisite: OTS 510. 2 credits.

OTS522 – Exegesis of Prophetic Literature

The prophets not only spoke of the world to come; they also spoke to people(s) in the world in which they lived. Our study of selected portions will help you to learn the forms of prophetic speech, the role of the prophet in the life of ancient Israel, the use of prophetic passages in contemporary preaching and ministry of God’s word. Prerequisite: OTS 510. 2 credits.

OTS523 – Exegesis of Wisdom Literature

The Hebrew Scriptures abound with varied types of literature. Among the last to be “discovered” for riches of meaning and significance are the “wisdom writings.” You will analyze selected portions of the wisdom of Israel in the light of ancient Near Eastern wisdom texts, and with a view to discovering the role these texts played in the life of the people of Israel, the development of God’s word, and their culmination in the life and ministry of Jesus, the truly Wise. Prerequisite: OTS 510. 2 credits.

OTS533 – Reading in the Septuagint

The first translation of the Old Testament was made into Greek about 250 BC. and became the Bible of the Early Church. It forms the basis for the theology and vocabulary of the New Testament. You will discover the Old Testament in its Greek translation by reading Messianic passages from all types of literature. You will learn about the origin, transmission, and significance of this vital translation. You will compare the Greek with both the Hebrew text and New Testament quotations. Prerequisites: OTS 509 and NTS 509. 2 credits.

OTS552 – Biblical Aramaic

There are two languages of the “Old” Testament. Aramaic is the language of sections of both the Book of Daniel and the Book of Ezra. On the basis of Biblical Hebrew, you will move to an understanding of the grammar and syntax of Biblical Aramaic, with special attention given to the reading and exegesis of Daniel 2:4-7:28. 2 credits.

OTS560 – Select Topics in Hebrew Scripture

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

OTS561N – Early Hebrew Exegesis

To any text that we read we apply a certain method of interpretation, or even a rudimentary form of exegesis. Quite a few rules handed down to us in hermeneutical classes or exegesis classes have a long history. In this class, we will attempt to examine the various methods of interpretation which were used in the early years of the formation of the Tanak, Judaism, and Christianity. What were the seven rules of Hillel and how do they apply to us? From where do the 13 rules of Rabbi Ishmael come? How did the community of Qumran read their Bible? Are there any clues in the Scriptures on how we are supposed to interpret the Scriptures? These and other topics will be dealt with in this class. 2 credits.

OTS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator required. 1-2 credits.

OTS618 – Exegesis in Legal Literature

The “law” of Moses was God’s great gift of grace to the people of Israel with the purpose of forming them into His holy people. In this course you will study selected texts of Torah, with comparison to extra-biblical legal materials, and with a focus of the role Torah was to play in the life of the people. You will also discover ways in which these texts relate to New Testament life and faith. Prerequisite: OTS 510. 2 credits.

OTS620 – Exegeting Hymnic Literature

The Psalms of Israel are among the greatest literary treasures from antiquity, and they form one of the most loved sections of the Bible. They are examples of great spirituality and deep theology. You will learn how to study the Hebrew text of the Psalms with reference to constructive form criticism, how to experience their poetic form, and how to minister to others from these ancient songs of hurt and joy. Psalms for class study will be selected to display a variety of style and content. Prerequisite: OTS 510. 2 credits.

OTS621 – Exegesis of Narrative Literature

Everyone loves a story! Some of the finest stories in the world are found in the pages of the Hebrew Bible. In this course you will learn how these stories work, how to discover nuances from the original text, and how to minister the truth of God from narrative literature. Prerequisite: OTS 510. 2 credits.

OTS622 – Exegesis of Prophetic Literature

The prophets not only spoke of the world to come; they also spoke to people(s) in the world in which they lived. Our study of selected portions will help you to learn the forms of prophetic speech, the role of the prophet in the life of ancient Israel, the use of prophetic passages in contemporary preaching and ministry of God’s word. Prerequisite: OTS 510. 2 credits.

OTS623 – Exegesis of Wisdom Literature

The Hebrew Scriptures abound with varied types of literature. Among the last to be “discovered” for riches of meaning and significance are the “wisdom writings.” You will analyze selected portions of the wisdom of Israel in the light of ancient Near Eastern wisdom texts, and with a view to discovering the role these texts played in the life of the people of Israel, the development of God’s word, and their culmination in the life and ministry of Jesus, the truly Wise. Prerequisite: OTS 510. 2 credits.

OTS633 – Reading In the Septuagint

The first translation of the Old Testament was made into Greek about 250 BC. and became the Bible of the Early Church. It forms the basis for the theology and vocabulary of the New Testament. You will discover the Old Testament in its Greek translation by reading Messianic passages from all types of literature. You will learn about the origin, transmission, and significance of this vital translation. You will compare the Greek with both the Hebrew text and New Testament quotations. Prerequisites: OTS 509 and NTS 509. 2 credits.

OTS652 – Biblical Aramaic

There are two languages of the “Old” Testament. Aramaic is the language of sections of both the Book of Daniel and the Book of Ezra. On the basis of Biblical Hebrew, you will move to an understanding of the grammar and syntax of Biblical Aramaic, with special attention given to the reading and exegesis of Daniel 2:4-7:28. 2 credits.

OTS660 – Select Topics in Hebrew Scripture

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

OTS661N – Early Hebrew Exegesis

To any text that we read we apply a certain method of interpretation, or even a rudimentary form of exegesis. Quite a few rules handed down to us in hermeneutical classes or exegesis classes have a long history. In this class, we will attempt to examine the various methods of interpretation which were used in the early years of the formation of the Tanak, Judaism, and Christianity. What were the seven rules of Hillel and how do they apply to us? From where do the 13 rules of Rabbi Ishmael come? How did the community of Qumran read their Bible? Are there any clues in the Scriptures on how we are supposed to interpret the Scriptures? These and other topics will be dealt with in this class. 2 credits.

OTS680 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator required. 1-2 credits.

Historical Theology  (CHS)

To understand and prepare for contemporary ministry, a Christian leader needs to understand the major movements in church history from Pentecost to the present. Western’s courses introduce you to key classic writings, theological controversies and developments, and examine timeless ministry principles from an historical perspective.

CHS505 – Wisdom from Church History

In this course we will learn from the history of the Church from Pentecost to the present. We will focus on (1) the Church’s people who, as saints and sinners, have been the flesh and blood of its history; (2) the Church’s doctrine which has developed throughout its history; (3) the Church’s writings which have exerted a tremendous impact on its history; and (4) the Church’s movements which have composed the ebb and flow, the progress and regress, of its history. We will also consider what the past can contribute to the present, seeking to learn lessons from the history of the Church for our own lives, ministries, doctrines, and churches. 4 credits.

CHS506 – Insight and Inspiration from Church History

In this course we will learn from the history of the Church from Pentecost to the present. We will focus on: (1) the Church’s people who, as saints and sinners, have been the flesh and blood of its history; (2) the Church’s doctrine which has developed throughout its history; (3) the Church’s writings which have exerted a tremendous impact on its history; and (4) the Church’s movements which have composed the ebb and flow, the progress and regress, of its history. We will also consider what the past can contribute to the present, seeking to learn lessons from the history of the Church for our own lives, ministries, doctrines, and churches. 2 credits.

CHS511 – Baptist History

The origins and growth of Baptists in England and America. The major part of the course traces Baptist beginnings in the American colonies and their accelerated development from the close of the Revolutionary War to the present. Examination is made of several principles which have characterized historic Baptist life and doctrine with special emphasis on the history of the Conservative Baptists. 2 credits.

CHS520 – History of Mission

You will examine the dynamic factors God has used in the expansion and spread of His church. Analyze successes and failures in mission endeavors, from era to era, by both Eastern and Western churches. Study strategies used by missionaries throughout the ages as a guide to forming a personal strategy of mission and an understanding of practical aspects and principles of world missions. 2 credits.

CHS552 – Learning from the History of Christian Doctrine

The development of key Christian doctrines throughout the history of the church. Students in non-Th.M. degree programs must consult with the instructor prior to registration. 2 credits.

CHS554 – Understading the Theology of the Reformers

The Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century is arguably the singular most influential theological and ecclesiastical movement since the founding of the Church of Jesus Christ. Following a study of the historical background of this movement, you will read and analyze the most important works of Martin Luther, John Calvin, and (to a lesser extent) Huldrych Zwingli to understand their theological distinctives and contributions (e.g., sola Scriptura, justification by faith, predestination, the sacraments of baptism and the Lord’s Supper). You will also consider how evangelical Christianity on the threshold of the twenty-first century can recapture the theological energy and renewal of these giants of the Reformation. 2 credits.

CHS560 – Select Topics in Church History

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

CHS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

CHS652 – History of Christian Doctrine: Scripture

The development of key Christian doctrines throughout the history of the church. Students in non-Th.M. degree programs must consult with the instructor prior to registration. 2 credits.

CHS654 – Understading the Theology of the Reformers

The Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century is arguably the singular most influential theological and ecclesiastical movement since the founding of the Church of Jesus Christ. Following a study of the historical background of this movement, you will read and analyze the most important works of Martin Luther, John Calvin, and (to a lesser extent) Huldrych Zwingli to understand their theological distinctives and contributions (e.g., sola Scriptura, justification by faith, predestination, the sacraments of baptism and the Lord’s Supper). You will also consider how evangelical Christianity on the threshold of the twenty-first century can recapture the theological energy and renewal of these giants of the Reformation. 2 credits.

CHS660 – Select Topics in Church History

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

CHS680 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

Intercultural Studies  (DIS)

In light of the cultural diversity in America and globally, anyone called of God to minister will be working across cultural and social barriers. Our goal is to prepare God’s people to recognize and creatively minister with effectiveness across these barriers. Students are given strategies and skills to develop effective interpersonal relationships, and to analyze culture and society. Emphasis is placed on intercultural understanding and effective local and global ministry.

DIS501 – Communicating Christ in Culture

Ministry is communication. The content must be known and experienced so the proclamation will have substance and credibility. After learning what we are to communicate, we must learn how to communicate. The course imparts fundamental concepts that will equip the student to communicate across personal and cultural barriers. 2 credits.

DIS502 – Perspectives on World Ministry

This course provides practical direction to students in discharging the mandate of the Church to go into all the world and to make disciples. Emphasis is balanced between the imperatives of evangelism and edification. The course gives insights into missiology, and its applications to the ministry of the local church. 3 credits.

DIS505 – Biblical Theology of Mission

This is a study of the theological foundations of mission. It examines both the Old and New Testaments, including Israel’s responsibility to the nations, the mandates of Jesus Christ, and Pauline missiology. The course also considers the contemporary issues of ecumenism, syncretism and universalism, as well as the emerging theologies of indigenous churches in diverse cultures. 2 credits.

DIS506 – Applied Cultural Analysis

Through an incarnational approach to ministry, this course seeks to inculcate a respect for, and understanding of, cultural diversity. Recognizing that cultural units are the social reality through which revelation was given and ministry is conducted, the student will develop basic skills for learning culture, including its patterns and networks. The course seeks to equip the student for a lifelong process of cultural learning, enabling effective ministry in multi-cultural settings. Prerequisite: DIS 508. 2 credits.

DIS508 – Applied Anthropology

Concepts of culture and cultural effects on the communication of God’s Word in different societies. Cultural assumptions and resulting patterns of attitudes and behaviors, as well as the need to use anthropological tools for field study, are identified. 2 credits.

DIS516 – Applied Linguistics

Outlines a practical method for learning another language in the living setting of its own culture. The course draws on introductory phonetics, general linguistics, and psycholinguistic theory. 2 credits.

DIS520 – History of Mission

The dynamic factors God has used in the expansion and spread of His church. Successes and failures in mission endeavors, from era to era, by both Eastern and Western churches and events are analyzed. Strategies used by missionaries throughout the ages are studied as a guide to forming a personal strategy of mission and an understanding of practical aspects and principles of world missions. 2 credits.

DIS526 – Religions of the World

A survey of each major world belief system is presented in order to learn the common themes expressed in different religions. Strategies are examined for establishing an effective witness to the uniqueness of Christ to each of the major religions. Includes field trips to local places of worship. 2 credits.

DIS553 – Women in Mission

The history of missions is a study of the dynamic factors God used in the expansion and worldwide spread of His Church. In this dynamic expansion throughout the last 2,000 years, God has been using faithful men and women. Because they are often overlooked in traditional courses, we will look at the unique and particular contributions of women in the process of expansion from Jerusalem to the uttermost parts of the earth. 2 credits.

DIS560 – Select Topics in Intercultural Studies

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

DIS562H – Introduction to Islam

This course is designed to help the student have knowledge of standard Islam. There will be a brief overview of the life of Muhammad, the Qur’an, the basic doctrines of Islam, Islamic fundamentalism, folk Islam, the main sects of Islam and the main approaches of reaching out to Muslims. 2 credits.

DIS580 – Individualized Research

An elective course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator required. 1 - 2 credits, as needed.

DIS581 – Survey of Missiological Literature I

This is a reading course for a survey of missiological literature in four areas: biblical and theological foundations, missions history and theory, cultural anthropology, and contextualization. 2 hours.

DIS582 – Survey of Missiological Literature II

This is a reading course for a survey of missiological literature in four areas: evangelism and church planting strategies, discipleship, theological education, and contemporary issues in missiology (e.g., urban, diaspora, poverty). 2 hours.

DIS680 – Individualized Research

An elective course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator required. 1 - 2 credits, as needed.

DIS701 – Cultural and Educational Anthropology

Anthropological theories, methodologies and techniques of culture and education are surveyed to develop an appreciation and understanding of commonalities, complexities and diversities of various people-groups. A holistic understanding of man is presented in preparation for a holistic gospel and educational ministry of contemporary cross-cultural workers. 3 credits.

DIS702 – Proposal and Research Design

This is a required gateway course and an introductory module in basic research design and survey of methodologies. During these sessions, the student’s Program Focus gradually emerges, the overall Learning Contract for completion of the program is drafted and approved, and a framework for research planning in anticipation of conducting research and writing the dissertation is presented. 3 credits.

DIS711 – Foundations for Ministry & Mission

This is an introductory course for the D.Miss. program. Basic understanding of the field of missiology and historical review of Christian missions are essential elements for this course. 3 credits.

DIS715 – Theology of Christian Mission

Themes and issues of both biblical and contemporary theology of mission are surveyed and reviewed, leading to the formulation of theological foundation for missionary effort, mission practice and mobilization. 3 credits.

DIS721 – Intercultural Communication

Students are given a foundation for relating insights from several disciplines to the essential task of Christian ministry - communication of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. A basic understanding of intercultural communication is developed in class lectures, readings in both scholarly and popular literature, and thorough examination of case studies. This course provides a framework for further study in areas of major importance to the intercultural Christian worker, areas such as education, management and administration, and contextualization. Application may include original field research in communication situations of the student’s ministry. 3 credits.

DIS725 – Integrated Missiological Research Methodology

Various types of methodologies pertinent to missiological and educational research will be surveyed and compared. Specific methodologies and skills will be studied with the express purpose of preparing students to conduct research for the dissertation. 3 credits.

DIS732 – Educational Theory and Pedagogical Methodology

This course provides an overview of the historical, philosophical, and social forces in the formation of approaches to various aspects in education, including teaching, learning and curriculum in North America and major cultures of the world. At the end of the course, students will gain an understanding of the interdisciplinary dimensions of educational thoughts and their implications and applications. Upon analyzing the various educational theories and models, students will be able to construct their own alternative frameworks and formulate educational strategy within the context of their ministries. 3 credits.

DIS742 – Contextualization

Being culture specific, leadership varies contextually. This seminar will cover the debate and literature concerning contextualization and leadership. Theological, theoretical and methodological dimension of contextualization and leadership are being covered in a seminar format in this course. 3 credits.

DIS744 – Evangelism and Church Planting

The broad areas of pioneer evangelism, planting and developing churches, and bringing those churches to maturity are discussed in the intensive sessions. A knowledge of church growth theories is expected as well as the ability to relate critical areas of communication, anthropology and the other disciplines of missiology to the central challenge facing the Church—giving every person the opportunity to acknowledge Christ as Savior and Lord. 3 credits.

DIS747 – Intercultural Education

Basic educational principles, as well as how those principles will be worked out differently in differing cultural contexts, must be understood. Cultural differences in learning and teaching styles are considered with their implications for mission. Education programs such as theological education by extension, correspondence courses, use of video, Bible institutes, and lay training used in intercultural ministries are to be examined and evaluated. 3 credits.

DIS749 – Intercultural Leadership

This course will cover leadership and mentorship in intercultural contexts. Matter of leadership operations across cultural boundaries and related issues will be examined. Another major component of the course is the creation of a mentoring process which facilitates leadership development and operations cross-culturally. 3 credits.

DIS751 – D.Int.St. Seminar

Specific topics are covered by specialists in their field. 3 credits.

DIS751K – Diaspora Missiology

This is an introductory course on “diaspora missiology” which is a new way of studying and strategizing the phenomenon of “people on the move from their homeland.” The methodology of “case study” will be employed to present the basic theoretical understanding and practical approaches of “diaspora missiology” dealing with several groups with special emphasis on Filipino and Chinese. 3 credits.

DIS760 – Colloquium

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 3 credits.

DIS790A – D.Int.St Dissertation-Project: Field Research

1 credit.

DIS791 – D.Int.St. Dissertation-Project: Writing

 (1-3 credits per semester) The dissertation is a comprehensive statement of the central problem of the student’s doctoral program and the proposed solution or course of action in ministry that has been developed during the program of study. It will include library and field research and, in many cases, the results of field testing of programs proposed. The dissertation-project integrates both the student’s previous experience and the completed studies. A minimum of six hours is required for 790 & 791 combined.

Jewish Ministry Studies  (JMS)

JMS501 – Theological Themes in Jewish Ministry

Contemporary theological themes in Jewish ministry are identified and analyzed regarding the bases for, and their impact on, mission efforts to the Jewish people. Appropriate evangelical responses are presented to better equip the Jewish mission worker with relevant knowledge. 2 credits.

JMS502 – Jewish History

An overview of the history of the Jewish people from the time of Abraham to the present day will introduce and organize the important periods and highlights from Jewish history. Special attention is given to the Messianic anticipation and the implications of Jesus in Jewish history. 2 credits.

JMS503 – History of Jewish Missions

The historical means, people and movements in Jewish evangelism are studied. Particular practices are identified from history in order to derive concepts and ideas for current evangelistic ministry efforts to Jewish people. The greater concentration of material is in the period from 1880 to modern times. 2 credits.

JMS504 – Jewish Religious Thought

The beliefs, practices and cultural elements of Judaism in the various current forms are studied. In particular, these facts of Jewish life are considered in their response to evangelical ministry to the Jewish people. 2 credits.

JMS509 – Practical Issues in Jewish Evangelism

A unique lectureship series on relevant issues in Jewish evangelism from practitioners on the cutting edge of the field. 1 credit.

JMS560 – Select Topics in Jewish Ministry

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

JMS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

JMS680 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

Mentored Field Ministry  (MFM)

Because Western students are being prepared for positions of ministry leadership, practical experience in ministry is an essential complement to classroom instruction. This ministry experience is even more valuable when it comes under the personalized tutelage of a seasoned and respected practitioner.

To that end, all students in the professional masters’ level programs are required to take at least six units in mentored ministry. The first two hours are devoted to a personal assessment course (MFM 500), designed to explore each student’s personality type, gifting, leadership style and other factors that might inform a wise vocational choice within the framework of God’s call. The remaining two-four hours consist of experience in the form of ministry to which the student senses a divine call. This ministry experience entails supervision and assessment by the student, a faculty advisor, and a field mentor. Thorough evaluation of key competencies will be done both during and at the conclusion of each field experience.

MFM500 – Discovering and Developing Ministry Potential

This personal assessment course uses a wide variety of tools that will enable you to gain greater insight into how your gifting, personality, passion, and background might best be matched with potential ministry opportunities. Substantial attention will also be given on how to gain maximum profit from formal and informal ministry training. An additional materials fee will be charged. This course should be taken during your first term of studies. 2 credits.

MFM501 – Mentored Field Ministry I

This course is designed to help students gain greater confidence and competence in the actual practice of those ministry skills that will be needed in the student’s anticipated ministry role. Mentoring is provided through both individual meetings with experienced practitioners and peer ministry reflection groups. Current involvement in field ministry is required for enrollment. Students should plan on taking one unit of this course over four different terms to enable sufficient breadth of ministry experience and pastoral mentoring. Prerequisite: MFM 500. 1 credit for each of four semesters.

MFM502 – Mentored Field Ministry II

This course is designed to help students gain greater confidence and competence in the actual practice of those ministry skills that will be needed in the student’s anticipated ministry role. Mentoring is provided through both individual meetings with experienced practitioners and peer ministry reflection groups. Current involvement in field ministry is required for enrollment. Students should plan on taking one unit of this course over four different terms to enable sufficient breadth of ministry experience and pastoral mentoring. Prerequisite: MFM 501. 1 credit for each of four semesters.

MFM503 – Mentored Field Ministry III

This course is designed to help students gain greater confidence and competence in the actual practice of those ministry skills that will be needed in the student’s anticipated ministry role. Mentoring is provided through both individual meetings with experienced practitioners and peer ministry reflection groups. Current involvement in field ministry is required for enrollment. Students should plan on taking one unit of this course over four different terms to enable sufficient breadth of ministry experience and pastoral mentoring. Prerequisite: MFM 502. 1 credit for each of four semesters.

MFM504 – Mentored Field Ministry IV

This course is designed to help students gain greater confidence and competence in the actual practice of those ministry skills that will be needed in the student’s anticipated ministry role. Mentoring is provided through both individual meetings with experienced practitioners and peer ministry reflection groups. Current involvement in field ministry is required for enrollment. Students should plan on taking one unit of this course over four different terms to enable sufficient breadth of ministry experience and pastoral mentoring. Prerequisite: MFM 503. 1 credit for each of four semesters.

Ministerial Studies  (DMS)

The Division of Pastoral and Church Ministries comprises those areas of ministry that are primarily local church based. Each discipline seeks to help students develop a theologically sound philosophy of ministry and those skills needed to apply effectively that philosophy in a wide variety of settings. Instruction is offered by both resident faculty (all of whom remain active in a variety of church ministries) and current full-time ministry practitioners so that a stimulating blend of perspectives and wisdom is provided.

DMS501 – Thinking Theologically about Ministry Leadership

Ministry is built upon sound biblical, theological and cultural foundations. Each generation of the Church must understand and build on these foundations, as well as discover relevant contemporary innovations and applications. This course intends to help you integrate an understanding of the Word and the world with the development of a personal philosophy of ministry. 2 credits.

DMS502 – Intro. Theology and Practice of Worship

The biblical concept of worship and the appropriate utilization of music in its public forms. Identifies the conditions, qualities, and ingredients that most enhance the integrity and meaningfulness of public worship. 2 credits.

DMS506 – Developing Godly Leadership

A core leadership course designed for those who intend to be future leaders of the church. This course will move from definitions to the core values of a leader; how to take ministry through a vision process, engage in strategic planning, decision-making, and implementation, build great teams, work through conflict and change, delegate tasks, and effectively mentor the next generation of leaders. Models from the corporate, political, and military worlds will be compared and contrasted with the biblical definitions and illustrations of leadership. 2 credits.

DMS560 – Select Topics in Ministerial Studies

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

New Testament Language and Literature  (NTS)

The Greek language is the gateway to the interpretation of the New Testament and its application to your personal growth and ministry. The required courses provide you with grammar, vocabulary, and syntax and with the ability to read theologically significant passages of the New Testament. In the elective courses you will learn exegesis and exegete some of the premier books of the New Testament, while integrating hermeneutics and exposition. Together these courses will start you down the path of being a lifelong learner and user of the Greek text. In addition to the courses listed below, already-designed courses exist in such areas as eschatological literature, the General Epistles, critical problems, and advanced Greek grammar and reading. Although these courses are not expected to be offered in a regular classroom format over the next three years, students may request them as independent studies. Alternative areas of New Testament studies may also be pursued through the NTS 580/680 Individualized Research option described below.

NTS501 – Functional Foundations of Greek

For students who choose not to develop the skill to read and translate the New Testament in Greek, Western Seminary offers the functional language track. It is designed to give students the practical ability to access the original Greek through the Bible Works computer program and other contemporary reference tools in a “hands on” approach to learning. In the first semester students will develop an understanding of the structure of the Greek language and the essentials of Greek grammar and syntax along with a foundational Greek vocabulary. 3 credits plus 1 hour lab. Language fee. (Note: NTS 501-502 are designed to be taken in sequence.) Portland or Sacramento campuses.

NTS502 – Functional Application of Greek

In this second semester of the functional Greek track students will develop their understanding of Greek syntax and learn the key steps of the exegetical process. They will use their skills to study the New Testament with access to the original language. By the end of the sequence, students will be able to use original language commentaries with discernment and do many steps of the exegetical process as they prepare sermons and lessons in ministry. 3 credits plus 1 hour lab. Language fee. Prerequisite: NTS 501. (Note: NTS 501-502 are designed to be taken in sequence.) Portland or Sacramento campuses.

NTS503 – Developing Foundations for Greek Exegesis

In this class the student will continue to develop the ability to read and exegete the Greek New Testament by memorizing additonal Greek vocabulary, learning to parse Greek words without the use of secondary tools, and translating a number of New Testament passages with particular theological significance. Prerequisites: NTS 501 and NTS 502. 3 credits.

NTS508 – Introducing the Foundation for Greek Exegesis

Recognizing the importance of using the original language for the interpretation of the New Testament, you will acquire a thorough foundation in biblical Greek. You will learn the essentials of grammar and an adequate vocabulary by doing exercises, by reading 1 John, and by the use of appropriate language and computer tools. 3 credits plus 1 hour lab. Language fee. (Note: NTS 508-509 are designed to be taken in sequence.)

NTS509 – Greek Reading & Syntax

Building upon the foundation of grammar and vocabulary, you will read substantial portions of theologically significant passages in all genres of the literature of the New Testament in order to build vocabulary and discover the value of the Greek New Testament for theological thinking and Christian living. To these passages you will apply the essentials of Greek syntax with a view to gaining an ability to think syntactically when reading the text and for solving significant doctrinal issues practical to spiritual life and ministry. Prerequisite: NTS 508. 3 credits plus 1 hour lab. Language fee.

NTS510 – Greek Exegesis: Acquiring Interpretive Skills

In this course you will bring together the skills of grammar, reading, and syntax as you develop a thorough, fifteen-step method for interpreting New Testament literature. You will gain an appreciation for various New Testament genres and textual criticism. You will produce exegetical and expositional products basic to constructing theology, teaching, preaching, and enhancing spiritual growth. Prerequisites: NTS 509. 3 credits.

NTS515 – Principles of Exegesis

In this course students will learn the principles of exegesis following the steps of a method common to both testaments with specific application to the Greek language. Topics include the definition and distinctions of exegesis, the relation of exegesis to other disciplines, and contextualizing the text. Prerequisite: NTS 509. 2 credits.

NTS520 – Exegeting Gospel Discourse Literature

Certain passages of the Gospels are significant discourses about Jesus’ relation to the Law, the nature of the Kingdom, His love for His people, and His future reign. Using the Greek text, you will interpret the major discourses of Christ, focusing on the Sermon on the Mount, the Parables, and the Olivet and the Upper Room Discourses. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or the consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS524 – Exegeting Johannine Epistolary Literature

The nature of fellowship with God is the basis of spiritual formation. Perhaps no other Epistles deal with this as well as do these Epistles from the Disciple whom Jesus loved. Using the Greek text, you will study the Epistles of John to understand the great themes of truth and love. You will produce exegetical products including an inductive commentary and a biblical theology. You will also be introduced to the structure, authorship, style, and problem passages of the Epistles. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS526 – Exegesis of Galatians

This epistle is one of the most critical in the history of the church. The Apostle Paul shows how devastating to the Christian gospel is the idea of requiring Jewish practices or adding anything else to faith as the means by which a person becomes justified, is reckoned as righteous before God, and thus becomes a child of God. By exegesis of the Greek text you will discover the argument of the author and the meaning of the text and gain insight into the life of the Apostle Paul. You will consider the introductory matters of authorship, date, and places of origin and destination of this epistle. You will give special attention to the matters of the role of the law in the life of the believer and the recent debate over the meaning of justification as raised by the new perspectives on Paul and the law. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS527 – Exegeting Pauline Soteriological Literature: Romans

The epistle to the Romans is the most important theological treatise in the New Testament. By exegesis of the Greek text, you will trace the argument of the author and do an intensive study of the great themes of salvation, righteousness and justification, sin and the fall, identification in Christ, the Holy Spirit and sanctification, Israel’s future, spiritual gifts, responsibility to the state, the judgment seat of Christ, the relationship of Jews and Gentiles, and other matters including the significance of the law for the believer. You will give special attention to the recent debate over the meaning of justification as raised by the new perspectives on Paul and the law. You will also study the authorship, date, structure, and place of origin of the epistle. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS536 – Exegeting New Testament Apocalyptic Literature

The interpretation of the Apocalypse of John continues to be a challenge to the Church. Comparing the Apocalypse with its antecedents in the Old Testament and the intertestamental literature, your exegetical study will include various interpretive systems and such problems as the rapture of the Church; the relationship of the seals, trumps and bowls; the antichrist or beast; the harlot; and the nature of both the Messianic Kingdom and the new heavens and the new earth. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS537 – Exegeting the Book of Hebrews

Few books of the New Testament so clearly exalt the person of Jesus Christ as prophet, priest and king, and so convincingly call the believer to persevere by faith in worship of Him. Interpreting Hebrews will lead you to spiritual renewal in mind and in heart. The warning passages and the theology of the epistle are a special focus, along with the matters of authorship, date, recipients, style and vocabulary. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS548 – Interpreting the Use of the Old Testament in the New Testament

Understanding how and why the New Testament quotes and alludes to the Old Testament is foundational to our faith. Such a pursuit has implications for textual criticism, hermeneutics, exegesis, theology and the spiritual life. In this course you will examine various passages where Jesus, Paul and the author of Hebrews used the Old Testament and why they did so. You will compare biblical methodology with rabbinic exegesis such as midrash, pesher and allegory. Other topics include the unity of scripture, typology, and the meaning of prophecy. Prerequisites: OTS 515 and NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS552 – Engaging in Textual Criticism

Understanding the textual history of our New Testament enables us to evaluate English translations and the making of Greek texts. This course enables you to evaluate various methods of textual criticism, exposes you to major textual problems, and provides direct contact with facsimiles of important ancient manuscripts of the text. You will focus on building your own method of textual criticism. Prerequisite: NTS 509. 2 credits.

NTS560 – Select Topics in New Testament Language and Literature

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

NTS561 – Reading Early Patristic Literature

Reading the earliest writings to appear after our New Testament, you will gain a new appreciation for the devotion of these early heroes of the faith. Translating representative portions of the Apostolic Fathers (Didache, 1 and 2 Clement, Ignatius, Polycarp, Barnabas, Hermas), you will engage in an inductive study of early Christian thought and practice, and discover such topics as gnosticism, ecclesiology, ethics, and spiritual formation. Prerequisite: NTS 508 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS580 – Individualized Research

Meeting specific needs of today’s student, this elective research seminar gives you the opportunity for a significant learning experience. You craft your own course of study to enhance your preparation for personal growth and future ministry. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

NTS620 – Exegeting Gospel Discourse Literature

Certain passages of the Gospels are significant discourses about Jesus’ relation to the Law, the nature of the Kingdom, His love for His people, and His future reign. Using the Greek text, you will interpret the major discourses of Christ, focusing on the Sermon on the Mount, the Parables, and the Olivet and the Upper Room Discourses. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or the consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS624 – Exegeting Johannine Epistolary Literature

The nature of fellowship with God is the basis of spiritual formation. Perhaps no other Epistles deal with this as well as do these Epistles from the Disciple whom Jesus loved. Using the Greek text, you will study the Epistles of John to understand the great themes of truth and love. You will produce exegetical products including an inductive commentary and a biblical theology. You will also be introduced to the structure, authorship, style, and problem passages of the Epistles. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS626 – Exegesis of Galatians

This epistle is one of the most critical in the history of the church. The Apostle Paul shows how devastating to the Christian gospel is the idea of requiring Jewish practices or adding anything else to faith as the means by which a person becomes justified, is reckoned as righteous before God, and thus becomes a child of God. By exegesis of the Greek text you will discover the argument of the author and the meaning of the text and gain insight into the life of the Apostle Paul. You will consider the introductory matters of authorship, date, and places of origin and destination of this epistle. You will give special attention to the matters of the role of the law in the life of the believer and the recent debate over the meaning of justification as raised by the new perspectives on Paul and the law. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS627 – Exegeting Pauline Soteriological Literature: Romans

The epistle to the Romans is the most important theological treatise in the New Testament. By exegesis of the Greek text, you will trace the argument of the author and do an intensive study of the great themes of salvation, righteousness and justification, sin and the fall, identification in Christ, the Holy Spirit and sanctification, Israel’s future, spiritual gifts, responsibility to the state, the judgment seat of Christ, the relationship of Jews and Gentiles, and other matters including the significance of the law for the believer. You will give special attention to the recent debate over the meaning of justification as raised by the new perspectives on Paul and the law. You will also study the authorship, date, structure, and place of origin of the epistle. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS636 – Exegeting New Testament Apocalyptic Literature

The interpretation of the Apocalypse of John continues to be a challenge to the Church. Comparing the Apocalypse with its antecedents in the Old Testament and the intertestamental literature, your exegetical study will include various interpretive systems and such problems as the rapture of the Church; the relationship of the seals, trumps and bowls; the antichrist or beast; the harlot; and the nature of both the Messianic Kingdom and the new heavens and the new earth. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS637 – Exegeting the Book of Hebrews

Few books of the New Testament so clearly exalt the person of Jesus Christ as prophet, priest and king, and so convincingly call the believer to persevere by faith in worship of Him. Interpreting Hebrews will lead you to spiritual renewal in mind and in heart. The warning passages and the theology of the epistle are a special focus, along with the matters of authorship, date, recipients, style and vocabulary. Prerequisite: NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS648 – Interpreting the Use of the Old Testament in the New Testament

Understanding how and why the New Testament quotes and alludes to the Old Testament is foundational to our faith. Such a pursuit has implications for textual criticism, hermeneutics, exegesis, theology and the spiritual life. In this course you will examine various passages where Jesus, Paul and the author of Hebrews used the Old Testament and why they did so. You will compare biblical methodology with rabbinic exegesis such as midrash, pesher and allegory. Other topics include the unity of scripture, typology, and the meaning of prophecy. Prerequisites: OTS 515 and NTS 510 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS652 – Engaging in Textual Criticism

Understanding the textual history of our New Testament enables us to evaluate English translations and the making of Greek texts. This course enables you to evaluate various methods of textual criticism, exposes you to major textual problems, and provides direct contact with facsimiles of important ancient manuscripts of the text. You will focus on building your own method of textual criticism. Prerequisite: NTS 509. 2 credits.

NTS660 – Select Topics in New Testament Language and Literature

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

NTS661 – Reading Early Patristic Literature

Reading the earliest writings to appear after our New Testament, you will gain a new appreciation for the devotion of these early heroes of the faith. Translating representative portions of the Apostolic Fathers (Didache, 1 and 2 Clement, Ignatius, Polycarp, Barnabas, Hermas), you will engage in an inductive study of early Christian thought and practice, and discover such topics as gnosticism, ecclesiology, ethics, and spiritual formation. Prerequisite: NTS 508 or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

NTS680 – Individualized Research

Meeting specific needs of today’s student, this elective research seminar gives you the opportunity for a significant learning experience. You craft your own course of study to enhance your preparation for personal growth and future ministry. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

Pastoral Care to Women  (PCW)

PCW511 – Pastoral Understanding of Women

This course fosters an understanding of the issues that impact effective biblical strategies for pastoral care to women. Students discover how the physiological, psychological, cultural and spiritual aspects of a woman affect good pastoral care. Featured is an understanding of seasons and transitions in life cycles against the background of societal role change for women, and the impact of physiological changes, nurturing needs and feminine perspective. Gender and cultural stereotypes are examined, and biblical strategies for developing friendships, mentor/protégé relationships, group support and other helps for shepherding women are presented. 2 credits.

PCW512X – Women in Pain, Part 1

Increasing awareness of experiences that cause deep pain in women’s lives enables one to offer strategic pastoral care and referral when needed. Issues discussed in this course may include breast cancer, same-sex attraction, eating disorders, sexual abuse, suicide, widowhood, post-abortion stress, pornography, domestic violence, and depression. Students learn how, from a biblical basis, to help women grieve losses, begin transition to health, and secure professional help when needed. 2 credits.

PCW512Y – Women in Pain, Part 2

This course examines additional issues that generate emotional pain in women’s lives. Issues discussed may include infant/child death, religious abuse, infertility, terminal illness, physical disabilities, military families, parents in pain, homelessness, and incarcerated women. Students will learn how to offer effective pastoral care and create an environment of grace and a healing community. 2 credits.

PCW513 – Women in Leadership

In this course students explore four essential components of being a Christian woman in leadership: call, character, craft, and competencies. Concerning the call of a woman in leadership, attention is given to understanding and valuing what motivates a person to lead. Students learn how to define and develop Christlike character and integrity of heart in private and public arenas. The art of leadership is examined, including cycles, styles, and gender issues. The many facets of being a change agent, communicator, and mentor are investigated, and insights are gained from biblical and historical examples of women in leadership. 2 credits.

PCW514 – Building a Ministry to Women

Students learn how to build and advance – from vision to reality – relational ministries featuring four components: cast the vision, build the team, discern the needs, and mold the ministry. The focus is on relational components, such as building and strengthening a leadership team, accurately discerning the needs of individual women and molding ministry around that unique profile while developing spiritual friendships and mentoring relationships. Students will learn how to enhance ministry effectiveness by reflecting emphasis in promotion, evaluation and celebration. 2 credits.

PCW515 – Developing/Delivering Life Changing Messages

Learn how to prepare and deliver messages that are biblically accurate, relevant and applicable. Use homiletic principles and skills to prepare and evaluate messages. Expand ability to involve audience, to maximize visuals, to include humor, and to modify content to fit situation. Prepare to speak with clarity and passion. Explore elements of effective devotionals, special event messages, and retreat series. 2 credits.

PCW521 – Develop Life Changing Bible Study Curriculum

Learn how to write, select and adapt Bible study curriculum that is biblically sound, relevant, and applicable to all arenas of life. Grow in confidence in training discussion leaders to shepherd biblically stimulating and relationally healthy small groups and curriculum-writing teams that can create materials appropriate for neighborhood and/or church-based Bible studies. 2 credits.

PCW560 – Select Topics in Pastoral Care to Women

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

PCW580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

PCW680 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

Pastoral Ministry  (PTS)

Effective ministry depends upon the practical implementation of a carefully crafted theology of ministry. Therefore, the courses in this discipline are designed to enable students to apply a sound theology of ministry in the work of the pastoral ministry. This is accomplished by providing both opportunity for reflection on issues of theory and practical guidance for performing the varied responsibilities of spiritual leadership in pastoral ministry. Among these responsibilities are accurate, relevant, clear, and persuasive expository preaching of the Word of God; management and administration of human and material resources; leadership in worship; the work of evangelism; skillful disciple making; and emphasis on missions.

PTS503 – Practicing Evangelism and Apologetics

Strategies and programs for biblically based evangelism are explored in this course. You will develop your own skills in personal evangelism, as well as how to do evangelistic outreach through the local church. You will develop an ability to address questions about the truthfulness or believability of Christianity that often arise in evangelistic moments through a biblically based and personally relevant apologetic strategy. 2 credits.

PTS504 – Maximizing the Church's Redemptive Influence

This course gives attention to the essential nature and vocation of the Church as God’s called people. Students are challenged to rethink the mission of the Church, moving beyond traditional assumptions, and relating the mission to a modern/post-modern context. Focus will be given to countering pluralism and the new paganism, determining a biblical strategy for accomplishing the mission, developing a social conscience, putting together a global approach to ministry, and creating the structures for achieving redemptive influence. 2 credits.

PTS505 – Providing Effective Leadership in the Local Church

This is a course that builds on the principles of DMS 506 and applies to the Christian organization. The aim is to prepare leaders to be effective in leading, be it in the local or para church. Specific issues include self-leadership; building a leadership team; creating a healthy staff-board relationship; leading an organization through change; crisis and conflict, and the dynamics that come with growth; effective management of resources—from volunteers to staff development to budgeting and expenditures; and leading the ministry into the future. 2 credits.

PTS506 – Providing Pastoral Care

This course will equip you to shepherd the church. A philosophy of pastoral care and the skills required for the practical application of this philosophy will be addressed. The role of the shepherd will be examined, as well as the spiritual foundations for pastoral care. The duties that come with shepherding will be taught, including the conducting of ordinances, weddings and funerals. The essentials of pastoral counseling, visitation, care to the dying, and congregational accountability will be covered. 2 credits.

PTS507 – Providing Pastoral Counseling

The core pastoral counseling course is designed to introduce ministers to the basic counseling skills needed in pastoral ministry. Course topics include paradigms of pastoral counseling, problems most commonly encountered, understanding your own natural style, when to help and when to refer, and developing a network of trusted referral resources. Basic helping skills will be cultivated through a variety of experiences (role play, video, live practice). 2 credits.

PTS508 – Developing Strong Families

The divine design for marriage and family roles and responsibilities is explored in order that the Christian leader may reflect and model godliness in these important relationships. Attention is given to improving both one’s own faithfulness and equipping one to provide counsel and spiritual nurture in such areas as pre-marital and marital counseling and parenting. 2 credits.

PTS509 – Laying the Foundation for a Preaching Ministry

In this course you will explore biblical, historical, and practical perspectives establishing preaching as the dynamic center of the pastoral ministry. You will learn sound homiletical values expressive of an informed commitment to expository preaching. 2 credits.

PTS510 – Preparing and Preaching Expository Sermons

In this course you will learn how to organize and develop life-changing sermons based upon and bounded by careful biblical interpretation. You will also learn how to communicate the relevance of the biblical message to your contemporary audience, and to deliver that message in a natural and effective manner. Prerequisite: DBS 506. 2 credits.

PTS514 – Preparing for a Preaching Ministry

Building upon the foundation of PTS 510, you will develop further your gifts for preparing and preaching expository sermons. You will prepare and preach sermons from various biblical literary genre, and will be video-taped and evaluated by your professor and peers. You will also gain preaching experience by delivering messages in settings outside the classroom. Prerequisite: PTS 510. 2 credits.

PTS515X – Advanced Expository Preaching, Part 1

This course is designed to further develop the skills essential to the expository method of preaching as introduced in PTS 510. As such, significant attention will be devoted to identifying the purpose and structure of a preaching portion and to translating these into a preaching form that faithfully communicates the meaning of the biblical text. Attention will also be given to enhancing communication skills necessary for the delivery of an effective sermon (introductions, conclusions, illustrations, etc). The student will prepare and preach sermons that will be video-taped and evaluated by professor and peers. Prerequisites: DBS 506, PTS 510. 2 credits.

PTS515Y – Advanced Expository Preaching, Part 2

This course is designed to further develop the skills essential to the expository method of preaching as introduced in PTS 510. As such, significant attention will be to the devoted to the distinctive features relevant to preaching various biblical literary genres (e.g. how to preach an epistle, a psalm, a narrative, apocalyptic), with an intentional sensitivity to Christocentricy. The student will prepare and preach sermons that will be video-taped and evaluated by professor and peers. Prerequisites: DBS 506, PTS 510, PTS 515x. 2 credits.

PTS521 – Develop Life Changing Bible Study Curriculum

Learn how to write, select and adapt Bible study curriculum that is biblically sound, relevant, and applicable to all arenas of life. Grow in confidence in training discussion leaders to shepherd biblically stimulating and relationally healthy small groups and curriculum-writing teams that can create materials appropriate for neighborhood and/or church-based Bible studies. 2 credits.

PTS524 – Enhancing the Relevance of Your Preaching

In this course, working with a variety of biblical passages, you will acquire skills for developing, from its meaning, the contemporary significance and application of a text of Scripture. You will analyze selected sermons to discern this underlying process and to observe its sermonic expression. You will also practice the reasoning processes that enable relevant preaching. Prerequisite: PTS 510. 2 credits.

PTS541 – Shepherding the Small Church

This course provides an overview of effective leadership within the context of the small church. The focus of the courses is upon how the pastor can understand the context of the small church and then provide spiritual and organizational leadership for the church. Special attention will be placed upon the cultural context of the small church and what the church expects of the pastor. DVD-Rom based course. 

PTS560 – Select Topics in Pastoral Ministry

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

PTS561L – Premarital Counseling

This course will focus on the rationale, tools, and procedures for premarital education and counseling. The student will be credentialed in the use of Prepare/Enrich materials. 1 credit.

PTS562F – Leading Transitions

Whether you’re called to church, parachurch or mission ministry, you’ll face the need to lead transitions. By engaging in a carefully orchestrated combination of resources including lead and resource instructors, live leadership interviews, case studies and real transition projects, students will learn how to negotiate the key elements of transition in order to lead their respective ministries forward into new seasons of productiveness. Participants will also be trained in the proven Titus Ministries Method for church transition, an invaluable tool for those in interim, transition or consulting ministries in the church ministry arena. Those who successfully complete the course can become part of the TMM Transitional Leadership Network. 2 credits.

PTS562K – Applying Biblical Ethics to Healthcare Dilemmas in Ministry

This course equips you with the ethical principles, tools for community networking, and biblical approaches to answer real-life medical-ethical dilemmas that will be encountered in ministry, both personally and professionally. These dilemmas include the decisions about: various forms of birth control, artificial reproductive technology, pre-natal screening, non-viable pregnancies, childhood vaccinations, palliative sedation, cessation of nutrition and hydration, and physician-assisted suicide. Principles and skills are developed as you work through a series of stories by caregivers such as hospital chaplains, medical center ethicists, critical care providers, and patients themselves. Further, the course is contextualized to your community in order to enrich your study and to learn how to develop local resource networks. Ultimately, you will develop a greater clarity about what is means to be “living and dying in Christ” (Romans 14:8). 2 credits.

PTS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator required. 1-2 credits, as needed.

PTS660 – Select Topics in Pastoral Ministry

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

PTS680 – Individualized Research

This is an elective course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator required. 1-2 credits, as needed.

PTS710 – Effecting Gospel Centered Transformation

The aim of this course is to rediscover the Christian gospel as the mega-narrative of the entire Bible, the hermeneutical ingredient necessary to understand the sacred text in keeping with its Spirit-intended meaning. The students will then explore various and practical expressions of ministry (e.g. corporate worship, preaching, pastoral care) as a consequence of recognizing the Bible as a gospel book. In addition, an entire day will be allocated to introducing the dissertation phase: broadly outlining the process, stimulating potential topics, and alerting the students to resources available for their research. 3 credits.

PTS712 – Research Design and Methodology

This is a core doctoral course covering research and design methodologies. Students will learn the basics for research at a doctoral level, including the use of library and internet, writing skills, and selection of methodology for ministry application and dissertation completion. Students will become familiar with proper form and style, and will be prepared to write a dissertation proposal. 3 credits.

PTS730 – Select Topics in Christ-Centered Preaching

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 3 credits.

PTS732 – Pastoral Preaching

Consult the D.Min. office for course description. 3 credits.

PTS737 – Pastoral Leadership

Consult the D.Min. office for course description. 3 credits.

PTS740 – Select Topics in Pastoral Leadership

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 3 credits.

PTS747 – Pastoral Care

Consult the D.Min. office for course description. 3 credits.

PTS750 – Select Topics in Gospel Spirituality

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 3 credits.

PTS752 – Pastoral Life/Spirituality

Consult the D.Min. office for course description. 3 credits.

PTS760 – Select Topics in Christian Coaching

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 3 credits.

PTS780 – Individualized Research

The student identifies an area of ministry need or personal interest and proposes a course of study addressing the topic. The course must be approved by the program director and the faculty advisor assigned to supervise the study. 3 credits.

PTS791 – D.Min. Dissertation

Application is conducted and evaluation made of ministry-related materials developed during the course. The product demonstrates the strengthening of the actual practice of ministry. It includes planning, doing, assessing, and reporting of ministry effectiveness. 1-6 credits.

Research and Thesis  (RES)

RES500 – Graduate Research & Writing

Necessary tools and methodology required for graduate-level study concentrating on the theological disciplines are examined in this course. Investigation is made of various library research tools, including the use of the computer in research and writing. Also studied are matters of proper form and style for academic writing. The course is required of students selecting the thesis option in their programs and is available as an elective for all students. 1 credit.

RES502 – Thesis

For students preparing a thesis, one or two credits per semester are scheduled until the thesis is completed. Minimum credits required: M.A. 3 credits; Th.M. 4 credits. Pre- or co-requisite: RES 500/600.

RES600 – Graduate Research and Writing

Necessary tools and methodology required for graduate-level study concentrating on the theological disciplines are examined in this course. Investigation is made of various library research tools, including the use of the computer in research and writing. Also studied are matters of proper form and style for academic writing. The course is required of students selecting the thesis option in their programs and is available as an elective for all students. 1 credit.

RES601 – ThM Guided Research

For students in the non-thesis Th.M. track, one or two credit hours per semester are scheduled until the guided research projects are completed. Two credit hours are required for completing the program. 1-2 credits, as needed. Pre- or co-requisite: RES 600.

RES602 – Thesis

For students preparing a thesis, one or two credits per semester are scheduled until the thesis is completed. Minimum credits required: M.A. 3 credits; Th.M. 4 credits. Pre- or co-requisite: RES 500/600.

Spiritual Formation  (SFS)

Effective ministry leadership requires much more than the acquisition of professional skill; for Christian ministry, as shaped and enabled by the Spirit of Christ, flows from one’s progressively renewed character. Leaders are called to serve as incarnate models of the truths that they seek to impart to others. Learning how to cooperate with and submit to God’s transforming grace is therefore an essential priority for every Christian minister.

Because of this importance of genuine godliness, Western’s curriculum makes spiritual formation an overarching priority. In other words, every course seeks to make some meaningful contribution to the development of Christian character. The foundation for this incremental growth is established by a series of core courses in spiritual formation. Subsequent courses from every discipline then reaffirm and expand these fundamental principles and priorities so as to nurture spiritual growth in every student.

SFS501 – Learning to Love God and Others

The theological and practical dynamics of evangelical spirituality will be examined to provide a solid foundation for rich fellowship with the Triune God and for living out of the Great Commandment. The nature of spiritual maturity will be examined (including a biblically-balanced model of priorities) and practical experiences for nurturing that maturity will be provided. 2 credits.

SFS502 – Practicing Prayer and Other Key Disciplines

Growing more Christ-like in our attitudes and actions can be nurtured through the spiritual disciplines taught by Scripture and practiced by believers throughout the ages. You will learn, from an evangelical perspective, the contribution each activity can make to your spiritual growth and how to enhance your actual practice of these “holy habits.” Extended attention will be given to developing a biblical understanding and practice of prayer. 2 credits.

SFS504 – Growing into Ethical Maturity

The ability to discern right from wrong—and to act appropriately in light of that assessment—is essential if church leaders are to maintain and model ethical integrity. Your moral sensitivity will be enhanced as you become acquainted with some of the fundamental issues involved in developing a biblically-informed personal, professional and social ethic. 2 credits.

SFS515 – Becoming a Spiritual Director

Biblical counseling also entails assisting others to grow in their positive response to God’s Spirit so that they might deepen their devotion to the Lord. Traditionally this dimension of interpersonal counseling has been known as spiritual direction. This course will help you develop both an understanding of spiritual direction and skills in providing it as you seek to become a faithful “soul friend” to others. 2 credits.

SFS545 – Reading Contemporary Spirituality

In this course you will read contemporary works addressing issues such as spiritual maturity, discipleship, prayer, and the use of spiritual disciplines. Authors chosen will represent Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox perspectives. 2 credits.

SFS560 – Select Topics in Spiritual Formation

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

SFS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

SFS645 – Readings in Contemporary Spirituality

In this course you will read contemporary works addressing issues such as spiritual maturity, discipleship, prayer, and the use of spiritual disciplines. Authors chosen will represent Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox perspectives. 2 credits.

SFS680 – Individualized Research

This is an elective research seminar course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval required. 1-2 credits.

Systematic and Biblical Theology  (THS)

The theology faculty at Western is committed to the personal development of a theology grounded in the Word and focused on the world. The goal is theological and holistic thinking, mastery of a practical theological method, and integrating biblical truths with a ministry-oriented worldview. You will personalize answers to problem areas and apply your theological insights in your life and ministry.

THS501 – Knowing the Living God: Theology I

You will begin to cultivate your ability to think theologically by exploring how theology is done in various approaches in order to develop a practical theological method. Then you will probe God’s progressive revelation focusing on the nature and authority of Scripture before pondering God’s triune nature and work culminating in the incarnation of the Son. Your passion for carrying out God’s mission in His world will expand as you begin to understand how the Father’s revelation has impacted the world He created. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. 4 credits.

THS502 – Glorifying the Word of Life: Theology II

Continuing the process of learning to think theologically you will now apply yourself to biblical revelation regarding the Son as the source of life. You will investigate humanity, its dignity as image of God and its depravity as sinful beings, the reality and impact of spiritual beings as backdrop for the atoning work of the Son and its application in the aspects of our salvation. Contemplating the majesty of the Son’s work in light of the depth of sin will invigorate our worship and impel our work for His kingdom. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. Prerequisite: THS 501. 4 credits.

THS503 – Living as the Community of the Spirit: Theology III

You will culminate the process of learning to think theologically by exploring the Spirit’s life-giving work. Then you will investigate the church as God’s covenant community and instrument of His present working, ending with the consummation of His kingdom program in end time events. Throughout the course the Spirit will transform us as we see our part in His grand work. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 506. Prerequisite: THS 501. 2 credits.

THS504 – Define and Defend the Christian World View

Building on the entire seminary curriculum, students investigate issues of contemporary significance exegetically, historically, and theologically. The course emphasizes the interrelations between the various aspects of theology, integrating them into a worldview. Students develop and apply a personal system of apologetics and consider aggressive challenges to the Christian worldview. Prerequisites: THS 501, 502, and THS 503. 2 credits.

THS505 – Apologetics

In your ministry you will face many questions about the truthfulness or believability of Christianity. Answering them effectively requires developing a biblically based and personally relevant apologetic strategy. We will develop approaches to such typical questions as evil, hypocrisy, Christ the only way to God, and relativism. 2 credits.

THS506 – Developing a Christian World View

Christianity goes beyond a personal relationship with Christ to truth about all of life, a world view. We will investigate exegetically, historically, theologically and culturally the assumptions and values of current world views which affect the way we think about our world. We will work toward integrating a personalized world view so that we can incarnate Christian principles in our life, communicate Christianity across cultural boundaries and disciple believers more effectively. 2 credits.

THS508 – Integrating Ministry and Theology

Building on the exegetical, theological and ministry foundations laid in the seminary curriculum, students will build an integrative approach to such issues as women in ministry, divorce, bio-ethics, and church discipline. Students will also work toward this integration by finalizing and defending their personal doctrinal statements. Prerequisites: THS 501, 502, 503 or permission of instructor. 2 credits.

THS511 – Survey Knowing the Triune God: Theology I

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) You will begin to cultivate your ability to think theologically by exploring how theology is done in various approaches in order to develop a practical theological method. Then you will probe God’s progressive revelation focusing on the nature and authority of Scripture before pondering God’s triune nature and work culminating in the incarnation of the Son. Your passion for carrying out God’s mission in the world will expand as you begin to understand how the Father’s revelation has impacted the world He created. Required for M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only; other degree students enroll in THS 501. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 2 credits.

THS512 – Survey Glorifying the God of Our Salvation: Theology II

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) Continuing the process of learning to think theologically you will now apply yourself to biblical revelation regarding the Son as the source of life. You will investigate humanity, its dignity as image of God, and its depravity as sinful beings, the reality and impact of spiritual beings as backdrop for the atoning work of the Son and its application in the aspects of our salvation. Contemplating the majesty of the Son’s work in light of the depth of sin will invigorate our worship and impel our work for His kingdom. Required for M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only; other degree students enroll in THS 502. Prerequisites: DBS 516 and THS 511. 2 credits.

THS513 – Survey Living as the Community of the Spirit: Theology III

(M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only.) You will culminate the process of learning to think theologically by exploring the Spirit’s life-giving work. Then you will investigate the church as God’s covenant community and instrument of His present working, ending with the consummation of His kingdom program in end time events. Throughout the course the Spirit will transform us as we see our part in His grand work. Required for M.A. in Marital and Family Therapy students only; other degree students enroll in THS 503. Prerequisites: DBS 516 and THS 511. 1 credit.

THS516 – Integrative Theology I

(M.A. in Counseling students only.) Students in this course will be challenged to integrate counseling theory with biblical theology, including the sufficiency of the Bible, the nature of God, the nature of people, the impact of sin, and the incarnate nature of Jesus.  Students will develop a gospel-centered understanding of key theological topics. Required for M.A. in Counseling students only; other degree students enroll in THS 501. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 2 credits.

THS517 – Integrative Theology II

(M.A. in Counseling students only.) Students in this course will be challenged to integrate counseling theory with biblical theology, including the gospel message and the role of faith, salvation, suffering, and forgiveness in the counseling process.  Students will learn to articulate clearly and defend biblically their own positions on these doctrines and to develop a clear integrative perspective for their ministry of counseling. Required for M.A. in Counseling students only; other degree students enroll in THS 502. Recommended pre- or co-requisite: DBS 516. 2 hours.

THS520 – Understanding the Atonement

Grasping the significance of the atoning work of Christ merits our best efforts for it is the heart of Christianity. You will do careful work to comprehend the biblical themes, interact with the major approaches past and present and grapple with the deep questions raised by atonement such as extent, healing, logic of substitution and limits of understanding. 2 credits.

THS528 – Theological Systems

You will examine Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed, Wesleyan, and other systems of theological thought. For each system you will examine a typical systematic theology as well as recent literature. You will gain an appreciation for the perspectives and contributions of the various systems examined. Prerequisites: THS 501, CHS 501, or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

THS536 – Evaluating Approaches to Sanctification

Every discipleship method and every exhortation to maturity in Christ originates from a specific theological understanding of sanctification, what one ought to do in order to grow into Christlikeness. This course studies intensively the major models of sanctification and evaluates them against such key passages as Romans 6 and Galatians 5 with the goal of helping you integrate a theology of sanctification which is biblically based and readily applicable to your life and ministry. 2 credits.

THS538 – Theological Ethics

Christian faith and theology have direct relation to personal and social issues of contemporary life. We will examine various systems of ethics as a basis for exploring the fundamental questions of how to go about formulating appropriate ethical guidelines and judgments. We will also wrestle with specific issues facing Christians living and ministering in contemporary culture. 2 credits.

THS540 – Theology of the Pentateuch

The first five books of Hebrew Scripture form the foundation for the progressive unfolding of the remainder of the Bible. You will learn the origins, development and principles of biblical theology and will apply the practice of biblical theology to difficult and celebrated texts in these books. Prerequisites: BLS 501. 2 credits.

THS544 – Theology of the Wisdom Writers

You will study the biblical theology of the Old Testament wisdom writers, particularly how their writings point toward Jesus Christ, the truly Wise One. You will also observe how these texts have elements of continuity and discontinuity with other wisdom texts from the ancient Near East. Prerequisites: BLS 502. 2 credits.

THS546 – Theology of Prophetic Literature

The prophets proclaimed God’s Word to Israel and Judah and also to the whole world. You will examine their theological perspective on such topics as God, history, Messiah, and the end of the age as well as understanding their writings in relation to the rest of the canon. Prerequisite: BLS 502. 2 credits.

THS551 – Understanding Biblical Theology

The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the subject and history of biblical theology, to investigate the unity of the Bible, to delve into the contents of the individual biblical books and show the links between them, to discover the ongoing flow of the revelatory and redemptive process that reaches its climax in Jesus Christ, and to explore the necessity and implications of biblical theology for ministry in the local church. 2 credits.

THS552 – Pauline Theology

You will examine the theological contributions of the Apostle Paul as you learn the methods and principles of biblical theology. You will analyze such topics as Christology, the law, the human as sinner, atonement, justification, reconciliation, new life in Christ, church and eschatology. You will also look at such foundational topics as the relationship of Paul’s theology to the Old Testament and to Jesus. 2 credits.

THS560 – Select Topics in Systematic and Biblical Theology

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

THS561 – Equipping for Spiritual Warfare

Spiritual warfare begins with evangelism and discipleship and goes on to helping people traumatized by involvement with the demonic. Knowing the types and limits of satanic stratagems against Christians and the church is essential in our increasingly pagan society. From a strong biblical and theological foundation, we will develop practical methodologies to help people find freedom from spiritual bondage. 2 credits.

THS561P – A Biblical Theology of Suffering

Bad things happen to God’s best people. Tragedy often transforms faith and joy into terrible grief and confusion. When suffering and evil assail us, we often react with hot anger against God mixed with paralyzing fear and doubt. If we formulate a biblical theology of suffering, we can prepare for the painful agonies of a broken world. Then we can minister to ourselves and others with less wavering, less denial, with realistic faith and hope, more like our Lord. We will reckon with how to live faithfully in a sin-marred, painful world. 2 credits.

THS564L – Prayer and Providence

Understanding the role of prayer in divine sovereignty is an essential question in the believer’s life. It is a part of grasping the balance between God’s providential guidance of the world and secondary causes such as obedience and sin. These sorts of questions merit our best efforts, for they lie at the heart of Christianity. You will do careful work to comprehend the various themes the Bible uses to describe providence and prayer, interact with the major contemporary and historical approaches, and grapple with some of the deep questions for ministry and life from personal and ministry perspectives. 2 credits.

THS565L – Highlights of Twentieth Century Theology

This course is a brief examination of selected European, North American, and Third World theologians and movements in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, with emphasis on the latter part of the period. Each theology will be examined in terms of its presuppositions, major tenets, argumentation, and it strengths and weaknesses. The activities will include readings, expository and critical lectures, class discussion, a term paper, and a final examination. 1 credit.

THS566J – Theology of Luke and Acts

This class will examine key themes in Luke-Acts. Special attention will be paid to the development of the portrait of Jesus, the program of God, and the call to disciples. 2 credits.

THS566K – Christology

A study of central aspects of the Person of Christ:  The virgin conception, incarnation, deity and humanity of Christ, his sinless and obedient life in the power of the Spirit, will be the main areas treated.  In the process, important issues regarding the Trinitarian framework for Christology, the relation of two natures in Christ, his impeccability, will be discussed and studied biblically, philosophically, and theologically.  In the end, the practical relevance of the life of Christ to living the Christian life will also be given strong consideration. 2 credits.

THS572 – Integrating a Theology of Women in Ministry

Near the top of the list of critical issues we are faced with in the church today is deciding what leadership roles in the church women may fill. You will examine key biblical texts, understand and evaluate the major positions and their underlying assumptions, interact with contemporary literature and representatives of each position, and apply the resulting principles to ministry situations in our world. 2 credits.

THS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator required. 2 credits.

THS605 – Apologetics

In your ministry you will face many questions about the truthfulness or believability of Christianity. Answering them effectively requires developing a biblically based and personally relevant apologetic strategy. We will develop approaches to such typical questions as evil, hypocrisy, Christ the only way to God, and relativism. 2 credits.

THS620 – Understanding the Atonement

Grasping the significance of the atoning work of Christ merits our best efforts for it is the heart of Christianity. You will do careful work to comprehend the biblical themes, interact with the major approaches past and present and grapple with the deep questions raised by atonement such as extent, healing, logic of substitution and limits of understanding. 2 credits.

THS628 – Theological Systems

You will examine Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed, Wesleyan, and other systems of theological thought. For each system you will examine a typical systematic theology as well as recent literature. You will gain an appreciation for the perspectives and contributions of the various systems examined. Prerequisites: THS 501, CHS 501, or consent of the instructor. 2 credits.

THS636 – Evaluating Approaches to Sanctification

Every discipleship method and every exhortation to maturity in Christ originates from a specific theological understanding of sanctification, what one ought to do in order to grow into Christlikeness. This course studies intensively the major models of sanctification and evaluates them against such key passages as Romans 6 and Galatians 5 with the goal of helping you integrate a theology of sanctification which is biblically based and readily applicable to your life and ministry. 2 credits.

THS638 – Theological Ethics

Christian faith and theology have direct relation to personal and social issues of contemporary life. We will examine various systems of ethics as a basis for exploring the fundamental questions of how to go about formulating appropriate ethical guidelines and judgments. We will also wrestle with specific issues facing Christians living and ministering in contemporary culture. 2 credits.

THS640 – Theology of the Pentateuch

The first five books of Hebrew Scripture form the foundation for the progressive unfolding of the remainder of the Bible. You will learn the origins, development and principles of biblical theology and will apply the practice of biblical theology to difficult and celebrated texts in these books. Prerequisites: BLS 501. 2 credits.

THS644 – Theology of the Wisdom Writers

You will study the biblical theology of the Old Testament wisdom writers, particularly how their writings point toward Jesus Christ, the truly Wise One. You will also observe how these texts have elements of continuity and discontinuity with other wisdom texts from the ancient Near East. Prerequisites: BLS 502. 2 credits.

THS646 – Theology of Prophetic Literature

The prophets proclaimed God’s Word to Israel and Judah and also to the whole world. You will examine their theological perspective on such topics as God, history, Messiah, and the end of the age as well as understanding their writings in relation to the rest of the canon. Prerequisite: BLS 502. 2 credits.

THS651 – Understanding Biblical Theology

The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the subject and history of biblical theology, to investigate the unity of the Bible, to delve into the contents of the individual biblical books and show the links between them, to discover the ongoing flow of the revelatory and redemptive process that reaches its climax in Jesus Christ, and to explore the necessity and implications of biblical theology for ministry in the local church. 2 credits.

THS652 – Pauline Theology

You will examine the theological contributions of the Apostle Paul as you learn the methods and principles of biblical theology. You will analyze such topics as Christology, the law, the human as sinner, atonement, justification, reconciliation, new life in Christ, church and eschatology. You will also look at such foundational topics as the relationship of Paul’s theology to the Old Testament and to Jesus. 2 credits.

THS660 – Select Topics in Systematic and Biblical Theology

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

THS661 – Equipping for Spiritual Warfare

Spiritual warfare begins with evangelism and discipleship and goes on to helping people traumatized by involvement with the demonic. Knowing the types and limits of satanic stratagems against Christians and the church is essential in our increasingly pagan society. From a strong biblical and theological foundation, we will develop practical methodologies to help people find freedom from spiritual bondage. 2 credits.

THS661P – A Biblical Theology of Suffering

Bad things happen to God’s best people. Tragedy often transforms faith and joy into terrible grief and confusion. When suffering and evil assail us, we often react with hot anger against God mixed with paralyzing fear and doubt. If we formulate a biblical theology of suffering, we can prepare for the painful agonies of a broken world. Then we can minister to ourselves and others with less wavering, less denial, with realistic faith and hope, more like our Lord. We will reckon with how to live faithfully in a sin-marred, painful world. 2 credits.

THS672 – Integrating a Theology of Women in Ministry

Near the top of the list of critical issues we are faced with in the church today is deciding what leadership roles in the church women may fill. You will examine key biblical texts, understand and evaluate the major positions and their underlying assumptions, interact with contemporary literature and representatives of each position, and apply the resulting principles to ministry situations in our world. 2 credits.

THS680 – Individualized Research

This is an elective course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program coordinator required. 2 credits.

THS697 – ThM Integration Seminar

In an effort to encourage the best in evangelical scholarship at the graduate studies level, the Th.M. director conducts an integrative course for all students enrolled in the Th.M. program. The primary purpose of the course is to investigate the interrelatedness of the several areas that constitute the Th.M. program. Students will strengthen their understanding of the doctrine of Scripture and theological methodology, improve their interpretative skills, learn to incorporate historical and philosophical theology in their work, and become better prepared to engage in scholarship that will serve the evangelical community. 2 credits.

Youth Ministry Studies  (YMS)

These courses provide both theoretical and practical instruction and experience for men and women preparing for a ministry with youth. The courses provide a firm foundation of knowledge, perspective, and ministry practice to ensure continued personal and professional development consistent with biblical values.

YMS501 – Understanding Adolescent Development

The cognitive, social, moral, and emotional development of adolescents will be explored. Particular emphasis will be given to the tasks, challenges, and crises during adolescence that are relevant to youth ministry, including the implications for the development of faith during the teenage years. 1 credit.

YMS502 – Developing a Theol. Model for 21st Century Youth Ministry

The historical, philosophical, and theological underpinnings of youth ministry will first be introduced. Then popular models of contemporary youth ministry (both congregational and para-congregational) will be described and evaluated. 2 credits.

YMS503 – Managing Youth Ministry

Specific competencies for leadership and management of youth ministry will be imparted, including the tasks of organizing, equipping, training, program assessment, staff relationships and personnel evaluation. Specific emphasis will be given to developing a growing and multiplying ministry. 2 credits.

YMS504 – Communicating to Youth

You will develop skill in listening to youth, reading youth culture, and analyzing current contexts of the adolescent experience. This will impart the competencies needed for relating to, speaking to, and entering into the world of a young person with the gospel of Jesus. 1 credit.

YMS505 – Issues for 21st Century Youth Ministry

You will gain proficiency in engaging contemporary youth issues from a biblical perspective, e.g., sexuality, poverty, globalization, internet, media, multi-culturalism, etc. 1 credit.

YMS506 – Spiritual Formation of Youth

You will gain insight into effective nurturing of an adolescent’s spiritual life through mentoring, spiritual direction, discipleship, and shepherding. You will also gain greater insight into the emergence of adolescent spiritual maturity. 1 credit.

YMS560 – Select Topics in Youth Ministry Studies

Occasional special courses chosen to fit the interests and needs of students and faculty. 1-2 credits.

YMS580 – Individualized Research

This is an elective course designed to meet the specific needs of the individual student. Direct guidance by a professor within the discipline gives an opportunity for a significant learning experience. Approval of program advisor required. 1-4 credits, as needed.

2016-2017 Academic Catalog