library

Linguistic Analysis of the Greek New Testament

In summary, Stanley Porter’s Linguistic Analysis of the Greek New Testament is a useful book, but there are significant portions that necessitate a prior understanding of the topics they cover. Additionally, some sections are accessible to those at different levels of knowledge in the field of Greek linguistics, so students would do well to skim the book if they are unsure whether or not they are adequately prepared.

opened book, lying on the bookshelf with a glasses

Top 5 Old Testament Theology Books

This is a list of my top five books on Old Testament theology. Although the discipline of Old Testament theology has included those who simply seek to describe the historical development of Israel’s religion, that is not the aim of those represented in this list. These books either lay out an organized theological overview of the Hebrew Bible, or consider methodological issues and approaches to doing Old Testament theology.

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Christological Anthropology

To date, Marc Cortez (Associate Professor of Theology, Wheaton College) has released a number of significant works on the topic of theological anthropology. This book is organized around seven topics, with a single theologian assigned to each of these. Topics and conversation partners include: sexuality, suffering, vocation, ecclesiology, ontology, personhood, and race, in dialogue with (respectively) Gregory of Nyssa, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, Friedrich Schleiermacher, Karl Barth, John Zizioulas, and James Cone.

Hell

Four Views on Hell

Four View on Hell supplies a means of exposure to perspectives that are presently being entertained within the pale of evangelicalism, generously conceived. All in all, regardless of whether or not one resonates with the viewpoints it adumbrates, this book nevertheless is to be commended for its lucid explication of four contemporary outlooks on the subject of hell.

forming habit

You Are What You Love: The Spiritual Power of Habit

Jamie Smith’s most recent book, You Are What You Love: The Spiritual Power of Habit, is a more popular version of his books Desiring the Kingdom and Imagining the Kingdom. It removes some of the more academic conversations and distills his thesis into a two introductory chapters. But the book is not just a redo; there are new metaphors, new illustrations and he applies his thesis to the spheres of Christian worship, the home, youth ministry, and work.