How to Think

I recently finished reading the excellent little book by Alan Jacobs titled How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds. In this post I will review some of the highlights of the book and make some applicational comments along the way.

Surviving and Thriving in Seminary

Intended to be a “no-nonsense guide to success in seminary,” this compact book sets forth accessible practical wisdom for the current or prospective seminary student. The authors identify three types of skills that are needed for the seminarian to succeed: spiritual, relational, and academic — and the authors work to incorporate insights from all three of these categories into this useful volume.

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Reading Backwards: Figural Christology and the Fourfold Gospel Witness

Hays asserts that the gospel writers demonstrate a figural, retrospective reading of the OT throughout their works. Just as the gospels cannot be understood correctly without understanding the background of the OT, so the OT itself cannot be correctly understood apart from the coming of Christ as revealed in the gospels. This valuable book examines the evangelists’ retrospective interpretation of the OT through the citations, allusions, and echoes they use to compose their masterpieces.

Rejoicing in Christ

As many of us know, Christian ministry should be firmly centered on the gospel. The power of God is found in the gospel. Yet, sometimes in our effort to be gospel-centered, “the gospel” can take on a life of its own. Sometimes if we’re not careful “the gospel” can become an abstract idea. Simply put, the gospel can be explained as good news. But, still, it’s one step removed from the substance. This is where Michael Reeves’s fantastic little book, “Rejoicing in Christ,” comes into play.