bible_newtestament

A Manifesto for Theological Interpretation

For a theologian, it is refreshing to find biblical scholars who are vested in the notion that Scripture ought to be read as something more than simply an ancient text. Indeed, those participating in the Seminar, on the whole, possess a deep conviction that the Bible is a book to be read in and for the benefit of the church – and that identifying Scripture’s proper ecclesial habitat in no way eviscerates scholarly endeavors concerning the text, but rather empowers them.

Greek Grammar

Can These Bones Live?

Jenson’s new monograph, “A Theology in Outline: Can These Bones Live?” is an edited transcript of an undergraduate course that Jenson taught at Princeton in 2008. This conversational and accessible volume is thus culled from twenty-three lectures covering a standard sequence of topics in Christian theology.

library

Linguistic Analysis of the Greek New Testament

In summary, Stanley Porter’s Linguistic Analysis of the Greek New Testament is a useful book, but there are significant portions that necessitate a prior understanding of the topics they cover. Additionally, some sections are accessible to those at different levels of knowledge in the field of Greek linguistics, so students would do well to skim the book if they are unsure whether or not they are adequately prepared.

opened book, lying on the bookshelf with a glasses

Top 5 Old Testament Theology Books

This is a list of my top five books on Old Testament theology. Although the discipline of Old Testament theology has included those who simply seek to describe the historical development of Israel’s religion, that is not the aim of those represented in this list. These books either lay out an organized theological overview of the Hebrew Bible, or consider methodological issues and approaches to doing Old Testament theology.

head_drawing

Christological Anthropology

To date, Marc Cortez (Associate Professor of Theology, Wheaton College) has released a number of significant works on the topic of theological anthropology. This book is organized around seven topics, with a single theologian assigned to each of these. Topics and conversation partners include: sexuality, suffering, vocation, ecclesiology, ontology, personhood, and race, in dialogue with (respectively) Gregory of Nyssa, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, Friedrich Schleiermacher, Karl Barth, John Zizioulas, and James Cone.