training women

Three Reasons Pastors Should Intentionally Train Women

Even though the life of a pastor is hectic, it’s likely that educating leaders in your church to use the Bible well is high on your priority list. However, with a busy schedule and a focus on developing elders, pastors sometimes overlook the training of women. Or perhaps they want to train them, but they’re not sure how. Either way, women likely fill more than half of the seats in your church and want to handle the Word of God correctly, so their training is essential.

forming habit

You Are What You Love: The Spiritual Power of Habit

Jamie Smith’s most recent book, You Are What You Love: The Spiritual Power of Habit, is a more popular version of his books Desiring the Kingdom and Imagining the Kingdom. It removes some of the more academic conversations and distills his thesis into a two introductory chapters. But the book is not just a redo; there are new metaphors, new illustrations and he applies his thesis to the spheres of Christian worship, the home, youth ministry, and work.

missionary life

The Missionary Life: No Shortcuts

What would you say to a budding missionary candidate? I have a close friend who is a veteran pastor, missionary, and now a member care director in the city in which I serve. He says there has been a surge of young adults in recent years who have landed on the field, enthusiastic to redeem the city and bring justice to the oppressed. But they do not stay longer than two years due to exhaustion, dejection, and even loss of faith.

cathedral_light

How Did Paul Understand the Trinity?

In recent years, there has been a growing gap between exegetical studies in the Pauline epistles on the one hand, and trinitarian theology on the other. A widely held view among scholars is that Paul began from the starting point of Jewish monotheism and then sought to understand Jesus and His relationship to God through that interpretive lens. This has led some scholars to assign Jesus a very close identification with God in Paul’s letters, but others to see Jesus as occupying a subordinate role to God. Wesley Hill enters this conversation and presents the alternative of reading Pauline texts through a trinitarian lens.