passover

The Theology of Passover

The observance of Passover is rich with theological imagery and symbol. Paul recognized this when he wrote, “For Christ our Passover also has been sacrificed” (1 Cor. 5:7). The promise of the perfect substitutionary sacrifice goes back go Genesis 22 when Abraham was ascending Mt. Moriah in obedience to God’s command to sacrifice his son.

passover lamb

Celebrating Passover

Passover is a springtime celebration—a time of new plantings and new beginnings. Passover and Israel’s exodus from Egypt marked a new beginning for Israel and served to illustrate God’s redemptive work. This is the event that the prophets and psalmists look back to and celebrate, even as followers of Jesus look back to and celebrate the resurrection of Jesus and our deliverance from the bondage of sin to freedom in Christ.

A Grey Theology for the Pacific Northwest – Part 1

For reasons generally related to religious aversion, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) has long been dubbed “spiritually dark,” and, more recently, the “None Zone.”[1] Here, ‘darkness’ and ‘absence’ are words used to describe the spiritual environment of the region. However, I suggest we consider a different word to describe the PNW: grey—a term that captures a particular attitude toward life . . . a mundane, humdrum, dullish mood about the nature of everyday reality.

work

Bridging the Sunday Monday Divide

Perhaps it is this season in my life, but I sense a growing alienation from this world. I find myself in a technocratic, post-Christian age that does not see this as the Father’s world. It is their world, where individualism reigns, freedom amounts to pursuing one’s own good, moral values are up to each person, fake news dominates the airwaves, gaining power and wealth are the ultimate objectives, and God is irrelevant.