Conference for creative

The Canvas Conference

How creativity relates to theology is a topic of ongoing conversation among contemporary Christians. While, in a former era, Christianity and the arts enjoyed an especially fruitful marriage (just think of Bach’s voluminous sacred compositions, or Michelangelo’s majestic work on the Sistine Chapel), in modern times, it often seems as if this union has been all but dissolved. So much so that, especially in the modern West, many would say the relationship between Christianity and creativity (at least of a variety marked by substance, excellence, and originality) has been defined more by antithesis than synthesis. The examples of this are manifold: kitschy religious-themed trinkets; derivative, sappy, theologically vacuous songs; and cartoonish portraits of a blue-eyed Jesus in flowing robes.

Hell

Four Views on Hell

Four View on Hell supplies a means of exposure to perspectives that are presently being entertained within the pale of evangelicalism, generously conceived. All in all, regardless of whether or not one resonates with the viewpoints it adumbrates, this book nevertheless is to be commended for its lucid explication of four contemporary outlooks on the subject of hell.

desire deep wells

The Antidote to Insatiable Desire

As far back as I remember I’ve lived with an insatiable appetite. I’ve always hungered for more – more of a good meal or a good feeling or a good moment. Regardless of how satisfying the food or the experience or the relationship may be, I inevitably awake desiring more.

cathedral_light

How Did Paul Understand the Trinity?

In recent years, there has been a growing gap between exegetical studies in the Pauline epistles on the one hand, and trinitarian theology on the other. A widely held view among scholars is that Paul began from the starting point of Jewish monotheism and then sought to understand Jesus and His relationship to God through that interpretive lens. This has led some scholars to assign Jesus a very close identification with God in Paul’s letters, but others to see Jesus as occupying a subordinate role to God. Wesley Hill enters this conversation and presents the alternative of reading Pauline texts through a trinitarian lens.