crucified and deny yourself

Following a Crucified Messiah 

Jesus is demanding nothing short of a willingness to die (literally!) for His sake. This is important to realize because language such as “cross bearing” and “self denial” is frequently used among Western Christians to mean they missed the latest episode of The Voice to go to community group or they had to do coffee with “that” person on their day off. But this isn’t what He had in mind.

library

Linguistic Analysis of the Greek New Testament

In summary, Stanley Porter’s Linguistic Analysis of the Greek New Testament is a useful book, but there are significant portions that necessitate a prior understanding of the topics they cover. Additionally, some sections are accessible to those at different levels of knowledge in the field of Greek linguistics, so students would do well to skim the book if they are unsure whether or not they are adequately prepared.

opened book, lying on the bookshelf with a glasses

Top 5 Old Testament Theology Books

This is a list of my top five books on Old Testament theology. Although the discipline of Old Testament theology has included those who simply seek to describe the historical development of Israel’s religion, that is not the aim of those represented in this list. These books either lay out an organized theological overview of the Hebrew Bible, or consider methodological issues and approaches to doing Old Testament theology.

places

On Mission In New Places

As Christians, there is no place the Lord could send us where his mission does not stand. Therefore, if the mission always stands, then the lack of Great Commission following that we find in our lives must be our fault, not the one who gave the mission. Where do we most often find this failure in following the Great Commission in our lives?

Conference for creative

The Canvas Conference

How creativity relates to theology is a topic of ongoing conversation among contemporary Christians. While, in a former era, Christianity and the arts enjoyed an especially fruitful marriage (just think of Bach’s voluminous sacred compositions, or Michelangelo’s majestic work on the Sistine Chapel), in modern times, it often seems as if this union has been all but dissolved. So much so that, especially in the modern West, many would say the relationship between Christianity and creativity (at least of a variety marked by substance, excellence, and originality) has been defined more by antithesis than synthesis. The examples of this are manifold: kitschy religious-themed trinkets; derivative, sappy, theologically vacuous songs; and cartoonish portraits of a blue-eyed Jesus in flowing robes.